Event Files on Linux

TSQL Tuesday

The second Tuesday of the month is upon us once again. That means it is time for another group blog party called TSQLTuesday. This party that was started by Adam Machanic has now been going for long enough that changes have happened (such as Steve Jones (b | t) managing it now). For a nice long read, you can find a nice roundup of all TSQLTuesdays over here.

This month, just about every SQL Server Data professional is being asked to get out of their comfort zone and talk about Linux (there are some out there that are very comfortable with Linux, but the vast majority are not 😉 ).

This is a topic that is near and dear to the heart of our organizer Tracy Boggiano (b | t). In Tracy’s invite, she says “While I know it takes a while to adopt new technologies; I was wondering what it would take for people to adopt SQL on Linux.  Alternating I’m offering up for you to blog about what everyone should know when working with SQL on Linux or anything else related to SQL running on Linux.

That pretty much leaves the door wide open, right?

Event Files

For the most part, things work the way you might expect them to work in windows – except it is on Linux. Sure some things are different, but SQL Server itself, is largely the same. That similarity, for the most part, boils all the way down into Extended Events (XEvents) as well. There is one significant divergence, however. And that is when it comes to specifying your event_file target for a new session. Let’s dive into that just a bit.

Let’s take a common setup for an XEvent session.

This will fail before the query really even gets out of the gate. Why? The proc xp_create_subdir cannot create the directory because it requires elevated permissions. The fix for that is easy enough – grant permissions to write to the Database directory after creating it while in sudo mode. I will get to that in just a bit. Let’s see what the errors would look like for now.

Msg 22048, Level 16, State 1, Line 15
xp_create_subdir() returned error 5, ‘Access is denied.’
Msg 25602, Level 17, State 23, Line 36
The target, “5B2DA06D-898A-43C8-9309-39BBBE93EBBD.package0.event_file”, encountered a configuration error during initialization. Object cannot be added to the event session. The operating system returned error 5: ‘Access is denied.
‘ while creating the file ‘C:\Database\XE\PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS_0_132072025269680000.xel’.

Let’s resolve the folder issue. I will create the Database folder (from a console session on the server), and then I will take ownership of that folder.

From there, it is also advisable to grant permissions to this folder to the SQL group via the chgrp command. Once done, re-running the entire session creation will magically work – including that windows based create subdir proc.

Alternative #2

Maybe we just want to do things via the default method. If so, we can do this and it just works.

Alternative #3

And of course, there is always this option. Unfortunately, this means keeping multiple session scripts in source control in order to maintain the differences between Windows and Linux as illustrated in these two examples.

With all three sessions now on the server, I can query my target paths to confirm the correct paths have been used.

This produces the following results for me.

Perfect, everything looks to be working and properly configured. Well, except for that session that is using the default directory – gag.

Wrapping it Up

Extended Events is a powerful tool with plenty of ease of use and flexibility. This flexibility allows the DBA to capably monitor the server for any issue be it small or large. This article demonstrated how to create an Event Session on SQL Server that is running on Linux. If you are in need of a little tune-up for your XE skiils, I recommend reading a bit on Extended Events to get up to date. For other basics related articles, feel free to read here.

Database File Changes

Data professionals around the globe are frequently finding themselves occupied with figuring out why and when a file (data or log) for a database has changed in size. Whether that change is a growth or shrink, or if the change was expected to happen or not.

I have written previously about the need to monitor these changes and how to do it more efficiently (there is even a fail-safe that occasionally works. As SQL Server improves, so does our ability to capture these types of events.

Given that SQL Server has undergone many enhancements, let’s take a look at the enhancements related to capturing the database file size changes.

Database File Related Events

If you read the articles mentioned previously, you will have encountered a previous article that include an Extended Event session that can be used for tracking file changes. That session is really good enough in most cases. One major change that I would suggest off the top is the asynchronous file target. While that target will work on all editions of SQL Server since 2008, the name of the target was changed in SQL Server 2012 to event_file. No big deal there. The XEM file is also no longer necessary, so that piece can just be wiped out.

That said, what else has changed? Let’s cover some deprecated events that may get you frustrated if you encounter them. The following events should be avoided because they will do nothing (a couple of them have been covered in this previous article).

  • sqlserver.databases_log_growth – Databases log growth
  • sqlserver.databases_log_file_size_changed – Databases log file size changed
  • sqlserver.databases_data_file_size_changed – Databases data file size change
  • sqlserver.auto_shrink_log – Auto shrink log ended.

Each of the preceding events have been replaced by a single event called database_file_size_change.

And then there is this one that I can’t seem to get to generate any events but it might possibly still be valid. In short, don’t be surprised one way or the other if it does something.

  • sqlserver.auto_shrink_log_caught_exception – Auto shrink log caught an exception.

Great, we have some events we can avoid. Now let’s look at some events we should consider.

  • sqlserver.database_file_size_change – Occurs when any of the data or log files for a database changes size. Use this event to monitor changes to the size of database files.
  • sqlserver.databases_shrink_data_movement – Databases shrink data movement
  • sqlserver.databases_log_file_used_size_changed – Databases log file used size changed (this one gets noisy – use judiciously).
  • sqlserver.databases_log_shrink – Databases log shrink

Now that we have some events that are viable as well as some events to avoid, let’s put a session together.

All we need to do at this juncture is test the session.

Let’s drill into the database_file_size_change event and take a closer look.

There are a few things going on with this event. As previously mentioned, this event captures multiple different types of size related events. If you now look at the sections that I have circled in red, you will note that there is a flag that tracks if the event was an automatic size change. It doesn’t matter if it was a growth or shrink, both can be automatic. The way we can tell if it was an automatic shrink is due to the negative value in the size_change_kb field.

Next up, we have the green highlighted section. I have three distinct timestamps circled and separated by a dotted red line. Note the time difference between each of the groups. Each group of events is separated by 30 minutes. As it turns out, if you have Autoshrink enabled on your database, the timer is a 30 minute interval. Yes! Autoshrink just so happened to be enabled on this database – for testing purposes.

Wrapping it Up

Extended Events is a powerful tool with plenty of ease of use and flexibility. This flexibility allows the DBA to capably monitor the server for any issue be it small or large. This article demonstrated how to use Extended Events to monitor for file size changes and the same principles can be applied to any of the waits you may need to investigate. If you are in need of a little tune-up for your XE skiils, I recommend reading a bit on Extended Events to get up to date. For other basics related articles, feel free to read here.

In addition, through the power of XE, we were able to capture a quick glimpse into some internals related to the database engine. In this case, we were able to see autoshrink in action and discover the frequency that it runs on when enabled.

Get the Source of PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS Waits

A client reached out to me for help about a wait_type they were seeing. That’s not terribly uncommon, but the specific wait_type was something that was fairly obscure.

Every day, they could see the delta on this wait_type continue to climb higher and higher. The problem was not in their ability to capture the deltas for the biggest wait_types. The problem as it were, was in figuring out what exactly was the root cause of their biggest wait_type.

What was the wait_type? Well, the obscure wait_type was called PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS. What causes this wait? As it turns out, this is a generic wait that is caused by SQL pipe related activities such as xp_cmdshell.

Knowing this much information however does not get us to the root cause of this particular problem for this client. How do we get there? This is another case for Extended Events (XEvents).

Tracking Pipe Ops

Knowing which wait_type needs attention is most of the battle in figuring out what precisely is causing the specific wait. The second piece of the puzzle is to understand whether the wait is an internal or external. This is essential because a different event is triggered depending on whether the wait is internal or external. There will be more on that in a future article.

Since I happen to know already that the PREEMPTIVE_OS_PIPEOPS wait is an external wait, then I also know that I will want to use the sqlos.wait_info_external. The downside to this method is that conventional wisdom teaches us that we must use the integer value for the wait in order to monitor for it. To find that integer value, one can query the sys.dm_xe_map_values dmv. Since the values of many of the waits change from CU to CU, then one should validate this value on every server instead of using the same value on all servers without regard.

Depending on which server I run that code on, I may receive different results.

As you can see, I have a small sample showing five different values for this specific wait. Using the wrong value on the wrong server could result in a bit of hair tugging since nothing may be trapped.

Due to this potential for change, writing a script to monitor for the session gets a little bit trickier and a lot more dynamic – for now.

After executing that script, the session will be created with the appropriate wait_type as well as the session will be started. To verify it is working, then I can execute a query that will use xp_cmdshell.

With that information in hand, we now have a tool that will help us identify the root cause of this wait climbing to the top of the waits list. Once I am able to identify the root cause, then I can start applying an appropriate fix (or do nothing if the situation deems that necessary).

But what about this map_key that keeps on changing with updates to SQL Server? Surely there is a better method than figuring out the integer value. As luck would have it, conventional wisdom is wrong in this case. There is a much easier method of creating this event session. So much easier in fact that I don’t need to worry about the map_key value. All I need to know is the wait_type I wish to monitor. So let’s look at a better version of the script.

This will yield the same results as the first script, but without the dynamic sql and with a more friendly script for the DBA to understand. This method is actually employed in the system_health system default session if you ever decide to peruse that session.

Wrapping it Up

Extended Events is a powerful tool with plenty of ease of use and flexibility. This flexibility allows the DBA to capably monitor the server for any issue be it small or large. This article demonstrated how to use Extended Events to monitor for a specific wait_type and the same principles can be applied to any of the waits you may need to investigate. If you are in need of a little tune-up for your XE skiils, I recommend reading a bit on Extended Events to get up to date. For other basics related articles, feel free to read here.

 

Note to Self

TSQL2sDay150x150TSQL Tuesday

The second Tuesday of the month is upon us once again. That means it is time for another group blog party called TSQLTuesday. This party that was started by Adam Machanic has now been going for long enough that changes have happened (such as Steve Jones (b | t) managing it now). For a nice long read, you can find a nice roundup of all TSQLTuesdays over here.

Sands of Time

This month, MOHAMMAD DARAB (b | t) invites us to do the 40 yr. old self reflection. You know that age that is almost as dreadful to reach as the righteous age of 50? From there age only gets better – or at least I have been told that. I have done a couple of articles similar to this in past TSQLTuesdays. Similar yet still different just enough. Check out my article on passion,  or this on one influence.

The problem with this particular challenge is the request to write a note to your 20 yr. old self. Well, maybe not an extreme problem other than the time travel part. As luck would have it, I recently discussed the topic with my grandmother. There was a lot of wisdom in what she taught me as we discussed the topic and I must admit, I was in agreement prior to even broaching the topic with her.

Passing Notes

Here is basically what my note to myself would say: “Self, you are doing good. Keep it up!”

That is even if I chose to send myself a note. You see, I would not want to change how things have happened. Life experience is good – both the good and the bad. All of it is necessary to grow and develop. Just like Mater’s dents, each experience is valuable and shouldn’t be changed.

Now, what if I were to create a note of advice for other more junior level professionals that I might be mentoring? That is a different story. My note to them would be simple – “Listen to me.” Maybe not so literally “me” and maybe more precisely as advice to listen to anybody who is giving their time to present, mentor, blog, or write (articles, books, etc). They are imparting of their experience and time and you should respect that and take advantage of it.

Not only should you pay respect to those giving of their time, but you should spend a little time to also give back to the community. Why? Well, I covered that pretty well in this article here. I will say it again, the more you give of yourself to help others learn your trade, the more you will personally learn and grow in your professional and personal self. It is an investment well worth taking.

 

Wrapping it Up

I don’t believe in trying to alter who I have become with any sort of visit back to my past self. The changes could cause me to change my path and not end up where I have reached due to personal growth and experience. Trial and error is good for growth. Everybody needs to learn that for themselves and cannot be forced into it. Just learn to grow and be patient with anybody you may mentor.

Easy Open Event Log Files

One of the beauties of using a tool such as Extended Events (XEvents) is the versatility and ease of use. XEvents can be used for so many things to help an aspiring DBA or Developer do their job better.

There has long been a sticking point about allowing various people access to production servers. Part of the sticking point is the developer who believes that access to read and evaluate trace files is mandatory on prod (yes I have heard many times where this has been used effectively by developers to gain prod access). But is that prod access truly necessary? Without an adequate method to provide the developer access to the trace data, the DBA loses confidence (from management) and standing ground for their side of the argument. How can a middle ground be met?

XEvents to the Rescue

With the use of XEvent tracing, a DBA is given a new realm of possibilities. This particular realm of possibilities becomes available when the XEvent trace (session) is created using a file target. Through the use of a file target, and the flexibility of XEvents, I have shown the beginnings of how a developer might be able to access the trace data easily.

That is merely the beginning though. There are a few more layers to making life easier for both the developer and DBA in regards to fetching event trace data. This article will show a few methods that will help make life just a bit easier.

Let’s start with the basics. After an XEvent session is created, it is important to know where the event file is being stored. If you don’t happen to know where it is, that is not a problem. The file source is easy enough to find and I have detailed it in this article.

Method 1

As shown in the previous article, the first quick method to open an XEvent trace file is from within SSMS as shown here.

After clicking on “Merge Extended Event Files…”, a new window titled “Merge Extended Event Files” will open. From the new window, follow the following steps.

Method 2

Now, that is an extremely simple method to open and view a trace file for XEvents. That said, would you believe there are other equally easy methods? Let’s look at the next method that is very simple as well.

As was previously mentioned, you will need to know the file location first and then navigate to that location. So let’s do that. My common location is C:\Database\XE. Once navigated to the folder, I need to choose my file to be opened and follow the prompts as shown here.

A new window will pop up. By default, SSMS will be showing. If not, you can select SSMS and enable the option to always use SSMS for this file type by clicking the check box before clicking OK.

Method 3

If the prior two methods feel unreasonably easy, then there is this next method that will spice things up a bit. It does require a bit of coordination. Once you have identified the file to be opened, you can elect to perform a drag and drop operation of the file onto SSMS. Once done properly, the file will open in SSMS and you can start evaluating the data.

Method 4

This is as equally simplistic as the previous method but requires just a scoch less coordination. This method involves a double-click method. A double-click on the file will open the file up in SSMS.

Method 5

If you paid close attention to the screenshots in method 2, you will have noticed that there was a menu option called “Open” that I did not discuss. If you select open from the context menu at that point, then the xel file will open in SSMS just like any of the other methods mentioned thus far.

Wrapping it Up

Extended Events is a powerful tool with plenty of ease of use and flexibility. This flexibility allows the DBA to better service the needs of the developers when the developers need access to the trace data. This article demonstrated another use for Extended Events. If you are in need of a little tune-up for your XE skiils, I recommend reading a bit on Extended Events to get up to date. For other basics related articles, feel free to read here.

Puzzles and Daily Trivia

TSQL2sDay150x150TSQL Tuesday

The second Tuesday of the month comes to us a little early this month. That means it is time again for another group blog party called TSQLTuesday. This party that was started by Adam Machanic has now been going for long enough that changes have happened (such as Steve Jones (b | t) managing it now). For a nice long read, you can find a nice roundup of all TSQLTuesdays over here.

The Why?

This month, Matthew Mcgiffen (b | t) invites us to come to a little puzzle party for our TSQL Tuesday party. Bring your favorite brain teaser, puzzle, questions, or interesting and complex TSQL problems/solutions.

This ties pretty nicely into the topic from last month (well at least for me). If you recall, last month Todd asked all of us to share some of our uses for databases in our personal lives. I submitted my article here, but forgot about one of my favorite uses for a database in my personal life – a daily trivia set about SQL Server.

So, why not elaborate on that database a bit today. Almost like a two for one. However, there is one little quick departure I want to make. My first puzzle solved with TSQL was written about many moons ago and can be found here.

TSQL Challenges

A long time ago, Jacob Sebastian ran regular challenges involving TSQL to get you to think about ways to solve problems using TSQL. The site is no longer available, but challenge #97 was about solving Sudoku puzzles. Here is my solution to that particular challenge. A little TSQL and a bit of the black arts and there is a nifty little solution. Even though I have this little trick in the bag, I still solve the Sudoku puzzles the hard way.

What a nice little stroll down memory lane there. That solution alone could satisfy the request for this TSQL Tuesday. Alas, we won’t stop there!

QOTD

Several years ago, I put together a little database to help with daily trivia questions. The database is a simple design and had a primary function to help teach SQL Server facts and internals to those with varying levels of DBA experience as well as helpdesk members. That said, the topic of questions doesn’t have to be SQL specific – it was my primary use.

With just a few tables and a few procs, I have a database that I can use to create questions, track responses from participants, and email questions and answers to participants on a daily basis – automatically. If I run out of questions, I just add more to the table. Nothing super complex there.

What this offers me is a mechanism to mentor multiple people without the burnout and while also gauging their true interest level in improving their SQL skill set.

Wrapping it Up

One of my favorite database automations is to send trivia style questions daily. This helps me to mentor and assess other dba talent within an organization without being too aggressive. Not only can a database be used for automation but it can also be used for numerous other automations. Beyond being highly useful for automation and training, there is also the possibility of using TSQL to solve puzzles like Sudoku puzzles.

 

Making Databases Personal

TSQL2sDay150x150TSQL Tuesday

The second Tuesday of the month comes to us a little early this month. That means it is time again for another group blog party called TSQLTuesday. This party that was started by Adam Machanic has now been going for long enough that changes have happened (such as Steve Jones (b | t) managing it now). For a nice long read, you can find a nice roundup of all TSQLTuesdays over here.

The Why?

This month, Todd Kleinhans (b | t) invites us to share something personal about ourselves. Well sort of. The invitation to each of us is to share a little about databases that we use in our personal lives or that we have created in our personal lives to help us in some fashion or another.

I think this is a really cool idea. Data and databases are very integrated into my life. The integration is enough that it would be difficult to un-blur the line where personal life and professional life begins when talking about data and databases.

Take a moment and reflect on the importance of data and databases within your life. At a minimum, you have taken the approach that data is your profession of choice and hopefully it is a career for you and not just a job.

If you have taken it down the career path, then you probably study your craft in your personal time to try and make yourself better at your trade-craft. Often times, if you are like me, these studies lead to trial and error, experiments, and possibly rabbit holes. If data is just a J-O-B, it is quite likely none of this will apply to you. Those are the types that fall into a category Steve Jones wrote about recently, and I would urge you to change that sooner rather than later. (Side note, I read that article as if it applied to me directly because I really do need to learn and practice more about my craft too!)

Personal Databases

Over the years, I have had sooo many personal databases that I have created for one reason or another. Some still need to be finished. Here are some examples of what I use a database for in my personal life.

Finances: A simple little database to track (sort of like a checkbook yes) credits and debits. More importantly, it tracked bills and due dates with dollar amounts for each bill. This is useful both for reminders for bills but also to see if there are any noteworthy trends with spending or increased costs. Now, many banking (and credit card) sites offer the same types of services – so long as the spending is done with their card.

Exercise: Back in the day, I tracked all of my activities in a database. I would track the duration, activity type, effort level and various biometric measures after each activity. Once again, this is something that is now tracked by so many different apps and databases that it seems counter productive to maintain my own system in favor of something that works more easily on a wearable device.

I have also previously done databases to inventory books, movies, track personal studies and link thoughts about studies from day to day, or even track routine chores (calendar reminders don’t offer much for tracking details). The short of it is, a database can be created to manage so many things as a part of everyday personal life.

 

Wrapping it Up

If you can use a database to create automation routines to help sustain your work life, you can certainly do the same to sustain your personal life. Databases are an essential piece of both my personal and professional life. Not only do I use them to create automation (such as this or this) for things, but I stand databases up to test numerous things from corruption to recovery to performance tuning to help improve my personal abilities and craft in the realm of data.

 

Passion, Challenges, and SQL

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: February 12, 2019

TSQL Tuesday

The second Tuesday of the month comes to us a little early this month. That means it is time again for another group blog party called TSQLTuesday. This party that was started by Adam Machanic has now been going for long enough that changes have happened (such as Steve Jones (b | t) managing it now). For a nice long read, you can find a nice roundup of all TSQLTuesdays over here.

The Why?

Long time friend Andy Leonard (b | t) invites us this month to do a little checkup on ourselves and talk about the “why” around what we do. This could be a very easy topic for some. Equally, this could be a very difficult topic for those same people at different times in their lives. Thus the problem, the topic is simple in nature but sure requires a firm reflection on self and what you have been doing.

The problem for me is less about the “why” behind what I do, and more about how to stretch it out into something more than a few sentences. Think! Think! Think!

Challenges

One of my biggest reasons why I do what I do, boils down to the challenges that I frequently get to encounter. There is a wild satisfaction to working on a very difficult and challenging task, product, tool, profession, skill, etc. This satisfaction often involves reward and a sense of accomplishment.

The challenge can be anything from how to effectively communicate with a difficult person, a tough to find internals problem in SQL Server that could be causing a performance issue, or taking over a project and turning it back from the edge of failure and onto a track of success. Sometimes, the challenge may be as simple as converting a pathetic cursor into a set based approach and gaining an improvement of 100x in performance.

I really do enjoy some of the puzzles (challenges) that I get to work on routinely. This gives me an opportunity to improve my skillset as well as continue to learn. Being able to continually improve is a great motivation for me. The frequent challenges and continual opportunity to learn presents a great opportunity to evolve ones self and career. In a constantly changing world, being able to naturally and easily evolve your personal career is a bonus!

Passion

“Do what you love and you will never work a day in your life.” This is a common saying in the United States. Agree or disagree – there is some truth to it. Being able to do something one loves makes the really hard days a lot easier. Knowing, I may be able to solve a complex problem makes it easier to face the day.

I really enjoy the opportunity to face difficult challenges and resolve those challenges. The passion to solve these puzzles with data doesn’t end there. I also really do enjoy the opportunity to learn which brings up two other challenges that help me learn: speaking and writing.

By putting myself out there regularly to speak and write, I am becoming a better technical person. I am becoming better equipped to solve many of the puzzles I face. Those are great benefits. That said, I don’t feel I could get out there and talk about something about which I wasn’t passionate. I have learned to become passionate about writing and speaking – though I still have plenty of room for improvement (just as I do in my quest to become a good DBA).

TSQL2sDay150x150Wrapping it Up

I really do enjoy the challenges I get to face on a frequent basis in the world of data. This is the big “WHY” for me to continue my progress in this career.

Find something you are passionate about and strive to envelop your career with as many opportunities to do that thing. If that means accepting some less wanted tasks in order to do more of the thing you love, it could very well be worth it!

Your Name is Your Brand

Categories: Blogging, Professional, SSC
Comments: 3 Comments
Published on: October 13, 2017

This topic is one that has been stewing for a while and finally this week it decided to boil over.

My first thought with this post was to write a rant. Instead, I want to try and turn it on its end and try to put a different spin on the problem. Yes – I said problem.

Know your Audience

This started when I was setting up a piece of software (to demo to a client) for a vendor that I respect – A LOT. I noticed something peculiar about the software that was different than the documentation (and therefore expected result). I reached out to my contact at this company and he escalated a ticket to their support staff. After a few back and forth threads, my contact noticed something troubling – as had I. While I was going to set it aside but my contact was bothered by it too. The support personal started calling me by the wrong name.

Addressing somebody by the appropriate name or title is a pretty important topic. In this case, not only did they start addressing me by some other name, they had also lost sight of the existing relationship I had with this company as well as any previous information provided to them demonstrating level of expertise in the area of SQL Server or with the specific observation being reported. This is demonstrative of a lack of attention to detail – both in regards to the audience and the technical problem.

Your Name is Your Brand

If I throw a few names out there like Paul Randal, Steve Jones, Grant Fritchey or Brent Ozar, chances are you will know who those people are (given you are reading this blog post). These are people (like many other giants in SQL Server) that have built a brand based off their name. This is a good thing. You recognize the name and you recognize that they are very good at what they do.

Building your brand is not an overnight sensation. It does take a while and possibly a bit of luck here or there along the way. The one thing it always starts with is your name. This leads me to my next story.

This week I have been at Summit. This is not the traditional DBA Summit hosted by PASS, rather this is related to Dynamics (AX, NAV, GP, CRM, 365). Just like most conferences, we all get a nice easy to read name badge.

Hopefully you can easily read that mine clearly says my name is “Jason”. Besides the name, there is a QR code on the badge. Otherwise, the name is large enough you can generally read it from afar.

While meandering through the Exhibitor Hall, I stopped at one particular booth that was raffling off an R2D2 that particular day (they also raffled off a C3P0 and a Yoda on other days). And yes it is very rare for me to stop at one of these raffles – but it was R2D2.

As I was stopped to fill out the form for the raffle, I was approached by an eager booth dude. “Hey Larry, how’s it going?” he said. He was obviously talking to me, so I turned to him and said “Jason” while showing him the name on my badge. Not even 30 seconds later he did it again “So, Larry…”. At the sound of that, I had to cut him off and correct him again and reminded him I had just told him my correct name and even showed it to him via the badge. At this point I abandoned the R2 raffle and told him I was no longer interested.

This was coming from a vendor that was more than likely hoping to try and pitch their software. A lack of attention to the audience at hand just cost him a lead (albeit small compared to the number they gained). Now, that vendor has to worry about the word of mouth that may come from their lack of attention and focus.

Now, my name is pretty important to me. It may not be as important to you – but it is to me. Similarly, your name should be extremely important to you. You and I are all working at a similar task – building our own brand based on our names.

I am sure both of these vendors I have illustrated are also keen on building the brand around the corporate name they have established. Brand and name are recognizable. Now, put yourself in either of these two scenarios I have just described. Have you ever made a mistake with somebody else’s brand? Or, have you ever been on the receiving end of this kind of mistake? Suddenly the world is spinning a slightly different direction, right?

I won’t divulge the names of either vendor in this case (partly because I still have a good relationship with the one and I have already forgotten the name of the second), but think about this: What do you do for your brand when somebody steps on it? How we react (and granted I probably could have taken a higher road in the second case by gently reminding the vendor yet again what my name was) can do quite a bit for building a brand. It’s not always about what you know, but also about how you conduct yourself towards and around others.

T-SQL Tuesday #028 – Jack of All Trades, Master of None?

Comments: 3 Comments
Published on: March 13, 2012

Another month and another opportunity to write about an interesting topic.  This month hosting TSQL Tuesday is Argenis Fernandez (Blog | Twitter).

This month, Argenis has invited us to talk about demons from our past.  Ok, not necessarily demons but at least share why you might be a Jack of All Trades or a Master of something or nothing.

Thinking about the topic, I thought of some very good stories.

Jack of All Trades

Back in the day, I worked in a one-man IT shop.  On any given day, my duties involved configuring SOHO routers and firewalls as well as higher end Cisco equipment.  I was also responsible for Active Directory, pc maintenance,printer repair, Exchange, domain registrations and all things SQL.

My least favorite duty was that of Janitorial Engineer.  It was amongst my duties to ensure the restrooms were stocked and that the toilets were free-flowing.  I can’t necessarily say that this skill helped advance my career.  I can’t say that it was even helpful at home.

I can say that this duty did help me make the decision to specialize more in SQL Server – though I was already headed in that direction.

Master, erm…

Like Argenis said in the TSQL Tuesday announcement, I don’t much consider myself an expert or master of anything.  I do think I am rather proficient and I do recognize many shortcomings within the vast technology, we love, called SQL Server.

I aligned myself with this technology because of the constant challenge and opportunity to learn.  I enjoy working with SQL Server.  I still do not find as much pleasure in plumbing as I do in SQL Server.

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Welcome , today is Wednesday, October 23, 2019