Easy Open Event Log Files

One of the beauties of using a tool such as Extended Events (XEvents) is the versatility and ease of use. XEvents can be used for so many things to help an aspiring DBA or Developer do their job better.

There has long been a sticking point about allowing various people access to production servers. Part of the sticking point is the developer who believes that access to read and evaluate trace files is mandatory on prod (yes I have heard many times where this has been used effectively by developers to gain prod access). But is that prod access truly necessary? Without an adequate method to provide the developer access to the trace data, the DBA loses confidence (from management) and standing ground for their side of the argument. How can a middle ground be met?

XEvents to the Rescue

With the use of XEvent tracing, a DBA is given a new realm of possibilities. This particular realm of possibilities becomes available when the XEvent trace (session) is created using a file target. Through the use of a file target, and the flexibility of XEvents, I have shown the beginnings of how a developer might be able to access the trace data easily.

That is merely the beginning though. There are a few more layers to making life easier for both the developer and DBA in regards to fetching event trace data. This article will show a few methods that will help make life just a bit easier.

Let’s start with the basics. After an XEvent session is created, it is important to know where the event file is being stored. If you don’t happen to know where it is, that is not a problem. The file source is easy enough to find and I have detailed it in this article.

Method 1

As shown in the previous article, the first quick method to open an XEvent trace file is from within SSMS as shown here.

After clicking on “Merge Extended Event Files…”, a new window titled “Merge Extended Event Files” will open. From the new window, follow the following steps.

Method 2

Now, that is an extremely simple method to open and view a trace file for XEvents. That said, would you believe there are other equally easy methods? Let’s look at the next method that is very simple as well.

As was previously mentioned, you will need to know the file location first and then navigate to that location. So let’s do that. My common location is C:\Database\XE. Once navigated to the folder, I need to choose my file to be opened and follow the prompts as shown here.

A new window will pop up. By default, SSMS will be showing. If not, you can select SSMS and enable the option to always use SSMS for this file type by clicking the check box before clicking OK.

Method 3

If the prior two methods feel unreasonably easy, then there is this next method that will spice things up a bit. It does require a bit of coordination. Once you have identified the file to be opened, you can elect to perform a drag and drop operation of the file onto SSMS. Once done properly, the file will open in SSMS and you can start evaluating the data.

Method 4

This is as equally simplistic as the previous method but requires just a scoch less coordination. This method involves a double-click method. A double-click on the file will open the file up in SSMS.

Method 5

If you paid close attention to the screenshots in method 2, you will have noticed that there was a menu option called “Open” that I did not discuss. If you select open from the context menu at that point, then the xel file will open in SSMS just like any of the other methods mentioned thus far.

Wrapping it Up

Extended Events is a powerful tool with plenty of ease of use and flexibility. This flexibility allows the DBA to better service the needs of the developers when the developers need access to the trace data. This article demonstrated another use for Extended Events. If you are in need of a little tune-up for your XE skiils, I recommend reading a bit on Extended Events to get up to date. For other basics related articles, feel free to read here.

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