User Contains Invalid Characters – Back to Basics

Remember When…

sqlbasic_sargeBack in late December of 2015, a challenge of sorts was issued by Tim Ford (twitter) to write a blog post each month on a SQL Server Basic. Some have hash-tagged this as #backtobasics. Here is the link to that challenge sent via tweet.

I did not officially accept the challenge. Was an official acceptance required? I don’t know. I do know that I think it is a good challenge and that I intend to participate in the challenge. I hope I can meet the requirements and keep the posts to “basics”. Let’s hope this post holds up to the intent of the challenge.

With this being another installment in a monthly series, here is a link to review the other posts in the series – back to basics. Reviewing that link, you can probably tell I am a bit behind in the monthly series.

Logins and Users

It seems appropriate to re-introduce the concept of principals (aka Logins and Users). Rather than go into depth about principals here though, I will refer you to a recent article on the topic. The article in question was another “basics” article and can be found here.

invalidWith that out of the way, it should be conceded that creating principals is a common practice and possibly a frequent requirement of the data professional. While creating those principals, there is a good chance that one will run into an absurd error ever now and then. Today, I want to discuss one absurd error. The fix for the error may seem just as absurd as the error, but would be really easy to implement.

Invalid Characters

Here is the error message that is quite possible to encounter while creating principals.

Msg 15006, Level 16, State 1, Line 6
‘SomeDOmain\jason’ is not a valid name because it contains invalid characters.

At first look, this error makes absolutely no sense. The error states there is an invalid character somewhere in the string “SomeDomain\jason”, yet every character in that string is supported and normal for the collation. This can be a head-scratcher for sure.

To better understand this error, let’s try to reproduce the error. First, we need to create a login.

Here, I have used “SomeDomain” in lieu of my actual domain or local workstation name. This statement will complete successfully given the user exists within the domain or on the Windows workstation. Great so far!

The next step is to create a database user within the AdminDB (you can pick a database that exists in your environment) and map this user to the Login created in the previous step. This can be done with the following script:

Bam! Executing the script produces:

Msg 15006, Level 16, State 1, Line 6
‘SomeDOmain\jason’ is not a valid name because it contains invalid characters.

This is where a close inspection of the script is required. Due to a fabulous fat finger, a 0 (zero) instead of O (capital o) was typed in the second occurrence of “SomeDOmain”. This is easy enough to reproduce with a typo of any portion of the windows login that already exists in SQL as a login principal.

The Fix

The fix is insanely easy once you figure out that invalid character actually means you mis-typed the Login portion of the Create User statement. The fix is to type the login correctly. Knowing is half the battle! Running into this error in the wild could cause you a few minutes trying to figure it out and prepping to throw something through the monitor.

Recap

In this article I have shown how a simple mistake can lead to a really obtuse error message that doesn’t seem to make much sense. A little care and attention to properly typing the login names will save you a bit of time and hair on the troubleshooting end of creating principals.

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