Disk Space and SQL Server

Disk Space in SQL Server

One of the frequently required job functions of the database administrator is to track disk space consumption. Whether this requirement comes from management or from a learning opportunity after a production outage, the need exists.

As a hard working DBA, you want to make sure you hit all of the notes to make management sing your praises. Knowing just when the database may fill the drives and prevent a production outage just happens to be one of those sharp notes that could result in a raise and management singing hallelujah. The problem is, how do you do it from within SQL Server? You are just a DBA after all and the disk system is not your domain, right?

Trying to figure it out, you come across a pretty cool function within SQL Server. The name of the function is sys.dm_os_volume_stats. Bonus! This is an excellent discovery, right? Let’s see just how it might work. First a sample query:

If I run that on my local system, I might end up with something that looks like the following:

Looking at the image you may be wondering to yourself right now why I have highlighted a couple of things. You may also be wondering why I used the word “might” in the previous paragraph as well. The reasoning will become more evident as we progress. For now, you have resolved to continue testing the script so execute it again and end up with something that may look like the following (for the same server):

Whoa! What just happened there? Why are there two listings for the C: drive? Why does each register a different value for the FreeSpace column? In addition without any additional usage on the C drive (as verified through other tools) the FreeSpace is changing between executions as well as within the same execution. This is problematic, so you continue testing:

And yet again!

This can’t be correct, can it? Just for giggles let’s modify it just a bit to see if there are any additional clues. Using the following changed script, hopefully a clue will help shed some light on this:

This script yields the following potential results:

Look at the different highlighted areas! There are three different values for FreeSpace for the C: drive in this particular execution. The case of the C: drive plays no role in whether the value is recorded differently or not. This seems to be more of a bug within the dynamic management function. From execution to execution, using this particular method, one could end up with duplicate entries but distinct values. The sort of the execution could be returned differently (though we could fix that).

All of these tests were run on my local machine and I really do only have one C: drive. I should never receive multiple entries back for any drive. If using this particular DMF to track space usage, it could be somewhat problematic if the duplicate drive data pops up. How do we get around it, you ask? Here is another example that I have that has not yet produced this duplication:

Using this version of the script is not terribly more complex, but it will prove to be more reliable. You can see I used some CTEs to provide a little trickery and ensure that I limit my results. What if it is a mount point or a non-standard drive letter? I have not tested that. Let me know how that goes. As you can see, I am restricting the drive selection by using the row_number function against the drive letter.

For alternative reliable methods to find your disk space consumption, I would recommend something different because it is tried and tested. I would recommend using a wmi call to fetch the data. Samples are provided as follows:

Easy peasy, right? Have at it and try tracking your disk space.

Thanks for reading! This has been another article in the Back to Basics series. You can read many more here. For other interesting articles about database space – check here or here.

No Comments - Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.



Calendar
March 2019
M T W T F S S
« Feb   Apr »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Welcome , today is Monday, September 16, 2019