Tricks and Treats with XE

With the proximity to Halloween, it’s not hard (knowing me) to figure out why I originally decided to terminate this series on the Eve of Halloween day. Join me as I share some treats and a trick to use with Extended Events.

Default Sessions

The focus of this article will be to introduce the default sessions deployed with SQL Server. Some of these are internal and “private” while others are more “public” and like a user defined session.

Azure SQL Database

What hasn’t received any TLC is Extended Events from the Azure SQL Database perspective. You may be wondering why it matters since I just said that Extended Events is the same in an SQL Server in an Azure VM as it is on-premises. That is Azure and that is the cloud right?

Exposure to Internals

The premise of the article today is to get a little exposure to some of the internals that may cause a bit of curiosity for you. I will share a means to expose some of the settings/stages/steps of various internal processes. These are the sorts of things you may have heard about, but without Extended Events, you might have to dig harder and further to find them.

Short Circuit Events

The predicate order is critical. Having the wrong order can result in not trapping the desired events. I cover the critical nature of predicates in the aforementioned article. At least in principle. Today, I want to reinforce the topic through the use of examples.

Counting Events

This article will show how to implement an XEvent Session that employs the use of the event_counter target that is used for counting events. IN addition, you will be shown how to parse the data and get some meaningful counts of event occurrences in your SQL Server Instances.

Histograms and Events

In this article I show how to use and configure the histogram target. In addition, I explain how to get to the data trapped into this target. Lastly, I demonstrate how to find the pertinent information for the target configurations.

Parsing Matched Events

In this article I will be taking you into the world of the pair_matching target. The pair_matching target should connote that this target works on matching like events into a single pair. Very much like a pair of socks would contain two parts, one for each foot or side of the body, the pair_matching target creates pairs of events that go together.

Matching Events into Pairs

In this article I will be taking you into the world of the pair_matching target. The pair_matching target should connote that this target works on matching like events into a single pair. Very much like a pair of socks would contain two parts, one for each foot or side of the body, the pair_matching target creates pairs of events that go together.

Know Before You GO – Target Settings

When adding a Target to a session, a configurable setting may or may not be obviously available for use with the Target. In and of itself, this can be mildly frustrating if the wrong settings are tried with the wrong Target. More frustrating is that some settings are required. While the required setting may be logically deduced, it does not always work out that way.