Murder In Utah

I am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

goldspike

 

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 349 in Utah will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Lehi, UT (just south of Salt Lake City).

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles at www.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Salt Lake City SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 75 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $150 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Utah for this workshop, I will also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on October 25, 2014 (the day after the workshop which is Oct. 24, 2014).  You can view the available sessions here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

Murder in Raleigh

sqlsat320_webI am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

raleigh_traini

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 320 in Raleigh will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Raleigh NC.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles atwww.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Raleigh SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 25 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $110 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Raleigh for this workshop, I hope to also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on Sep 6 2014 (the day after the workshop which is Sep 5, 2014).  I hope to update with the selected session(s) when that information becomes available.

You can see more details about the topics lined up for this event – here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

DC SQLSat

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: December 11, 2013

dcThis past weekend I had the opportunity to go visit Washington DC.  It was the first time I got to stay in the Nation’s capitol for more than just a few hours.  It is also the first time that I was able to see any of the monuments in the capitol area.  Granted, I only saw them from the car or plane window in passing.  But that is far better than seeing them in photos or not at all.

The reason for the visit?  It was SQL Saturday 233.  I had written a little about the opportunity here, as it approached.  Now, I have the chance to recap the event and what I learned.

sqlsat233_web

Some articles have already been written at the time of this writing.  One article that I want to mention is by Ayman El-Ghazali (blog) that you can read here.  I had a good conversation with Ayman in the speaker room in between some of the sessions.  Ayman struck me as a very humble and appreciative person.  Those are traits that are important to have as a DBA these days.  Then to read the blog post by Ayman, it was refreshing to see those same traits echoed in his writing.  Check it out and give him a shout out.

Something that I found funny throughout the few days I was in town was the repeated looks and comments by the locals.  I wear shorts just about as frequently as I can.  The morning before I left to head to DC, the local temperature had warmed to -2 by late morning.  The day of this writing, I saw the local temperature at -8 in the morning (8 am) and -4 at 6 pm.  Just a couple days before those temperatures, the temperatures were well north of 50.  The temperatures in DC were in the 40’s and 50’s and it really felt more like 70’s and 80’s for me.

You can imagine the comments about the shorts and me thinking it was Vegas or something like that.  Well, it did feel rather warm – almost tropical.  But, since the locals were bundled in parkas, using umbrellas and generally bundled from head to toe (for the rather warm weather), I decided I needed to provide a frosty perspective on the SQL Saturday event / weekend.

dc_frostThat should help you feel chilly now that the photo is “iced” over.

Despite the weather or the pending doom and gloom of the weather (which is still happening with the ice storms), the event was great.  The event was well organized.  I think that is mostly due to Gigi Bell (twitter).  She is the wife of Chris Bell (twitter) and she whipped those boys into shape. ;)

There were some things that couldn’t be controlled necessarily.  But everybody came together and helped to make it work.  We had a couple of cancellations.  I was lucky enough to get an opportunity to present a second session thanks to one of these cancellations.  I enjoyed presenting to packed rooms and I enjoyed the feedback.  One comment came back saying “I learned so much more than I expected.”  That is GREAT!

I also had a great time seeing SQLFamily.  Talking with friends and enjoying everybody’s company.  I did make it to a few sessions outside of mine.  I took great pride in harassing Robert Pearl.  I learned some soft skills from Alan Hirt.  And I got to chat with attendees while trying to answer their questions in the halls.

I am looking forward to this event again next year.  And I hope everybody that attended my sessions learned at least one thing.

One last thing.  Thanks to all of the attendees.  To say “the attendees were great,” at this event, would be a gross mis-understatement in my opinion.  The attendees were awake and engaged.  They invested their time and effort and I think they helped to make the event top notch.

Join The SQL Crazy Train

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: September 13, 2013

viewfromsqltrain

One of the best lines I heard in the past few weeks was “That train has sailed.”  Combine that with a crazy schedule and we now have a SQL Crazy train that floats from event to event.

Next whistle stop is Providence Rhode Island at…

logo

 

Event Details

Event Date: September 21, 2013
Time: 8am – 6pm
Location: 1408 Division Rd East Greenwich, RI 02818
Directions: Available on the Location page
Twitter: Join the conversation with #sqlsat213

 

I was able to present at Providence last year and I have been lucky enough to have been asked back.  This year I will be giving two sessions, and they are the same sessions as last year.  Let’s see how well we can do this year.

I am looking forward to this trip.  There are a few people I haven’t seen for a while on the east coast.  This will afford me the opportunity to chat and network with these folks again.

If you visit the event website, you might even catch a glimpse of the featured speakers.

Here are some of the courses that stood out to me.  Sadly, some of them are in direct conflict with my presentation times.

Paresh Motiwala (twitter)

Database Forensics – Part 1 and 2

These are the days of increasing cyber and computer crimes. As DBAs and guardians of corporate data, it is your paramount duty to not only prevent any data loss but also discover lost , damaged or sabotaged data. But how can you do that without destroying evidence? Remember electronic evidence is extremely fragile. In this the first of the two part session, we will explore the following: 1. Fundamentals of Computer Forensics 2. Tools to use in Computer Forensics–Data Acquisition 3. Processing a crime scene 4. Network Forensics and Live Acquistions. 5. Submitting reports

Session Level: Advanced

 

Mike Hillwig (twitter)

What the VLF?

Experienced DBAs know that SQL Server stores data in data files and transaction log files. What is less commonly known is that the transaction log file is broken up into smaller segments known as Virtual Log Files, or VLFs. Having too many VLFs will cause performance to suffer. And having too few will cause backup performance to suffer. How do you strike the right balance? In this more advanced session, veteran DBA Mike Hillwig will show you what VLFs are, how they’re created, how to identify them, and how to strike the right balance between too few and too many.

Session Level: Advanced

 

DBA’s Rules for Dummies… And Developers

In many organizations, there is a rift between DBAs and developers. The root cause is that there isn’t often an established framework between what the DBAs need to manage the data and what developers need to help solve business problems. Many DBAs think that developers just write code without considering the impact to the data. And many developers think that DBA means ‘Dont’ Bother Asking.” In this session for developers, veteran production DBA Mike Hillwig will help you understand the DBA’s needs in order to help you bridge that gap in your organization and work better to help solve business problems.

Session Level: Beginner

 

Sebastian Meine (twitter)

15 aspects of SQL Server indexes that you might not know

You probably know that indexes make you queries faster. But do you know why? Knowing how the different index types work under the covers will help you make the right decisions when (re-)designing you indexing strategy. After attending this demo rich session you will be able to – Explain the differences between SQL Servers 9 “index” types – Identify the layout of SQL Server data on disk – Decide which index types are the right ones to use for a given query – Assess the impact of the Key on access speed

Session Level: Intermediate

I am curious about the forensics.  I am intrigued about the presentation that Sebastian is doing on indexes.  I want to sit in on Mike Hillwigs topics because I heard he wants to be ribbed and heckled.  Both of Mike’s sessions are at the same time as mine.  I’ll have to catch him some other time. Unless…

DB Forensics 2 and Sebastian’s presentation are at the same time, so I will only be able to hit one of those two as well.

That means, I will probably float around from session to session or in the hallways or maybe in a lounge somewhere to either network or talk shop with anybody who might be doing the same thing.  There are a lot of good sessions and it is really hard to play favorites and pick just one and sit in that the whole time. ;)

So I have to ask. Will you be joining the SQL Crazy Train at our whistle stop in Providence? If so, come say hi and we can chat.

My SQLSat54 Experience

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: October 25, 2010

In case you hadn’t heard SQLSaturday #54 was Oct 23 in Salt Lake City.  It was a dreary opening to the Deer hunt, and a good morning to be inside to learn about SQL Server.  I was there to make my first presentation at a larger scale event (than a UG setting).

I got to meet some cool people and to learn a few things while I was there.  I enjoyed the time I had to chat with Denny Cherry (Twitter | Blog), Nic Cain (Twitter | Blog), Bill Pearson (Twitter), TJay Belt (Twitter | Blog), Pat Wright (Twitter | Blog), Meredith Ryan-Smith (Twitter), and Randy Knight (Twitter) as well as some others.

I picked up a few pointers for when we do a SQLSat in Las Vegas (like order overkill on the pizza).  It is also encouraging after having participated in a SQLSat to just get out and do it.  Nevermind the concerns about this or that, just do it.  So we will be formally working toward a SQLSat in LV very shortly.  I will be presenting that to the UG in LV first though.  We had tinkered with the idea – but now it is time to do something about it.

If you have never participated in a SQLSat, I highly recommend that you do.  I got some good networking in, some knowledge transfer, and I got to give my presentation (which needs a little more tuning).  That brings me to another thing that I learned.  It seems to be a trend that it is difficult to get audience participation no matter where you go (first hand experience as well as from what I have heard).  As presenters, many thrive on participation.  For my presentations – participation is crucial.

I hope to see you at future SQL Saturdays.

Oh,  and many thanks to Tjay Belt and Pat Wright for organizing this event.  Great Job.

SQLSat 54

Comments: No Comments
Published on: October 1, 2010

Wow, I have really been kinda slow in the blog department for a couple of weeks now.  I have a few things in queue that i will be letting out within the next week.

I got notice today that I have a presentation on the slate for SQL Saturday #54 – woohoo.  I was honestly unsure of whether I would be able to present.  I was hopeful but this is a new venture for me.  I hope to get to meet some of you at SQL Saturday 54.

You can find more info on it here.  You should be able to read my little blurb for the presentation as well as find a bit of a bio about me there.

BTW, I am a bit stoked to be able to do this in the community.

SQLSaturday SLC 2010

Comments: No Comments
Published on: September 1, 2010

Well, I have taken another plunge.  I finally got around to submitting a session for SQL Saturday Salt Lake City 2010 (Web | #sqlsat54 ).  I had been planning on doing this since it was announced through the grapevine.  The delay for submitting the first session really came down to a bit of confidence in writing an abstract on the topic.  Writing abstracts is new territory for me.  I plan on improving in this domain, thus will need to submit a few more abstracts to various different events.  That said – SQL Sat SLC will be the first but not the last.  If you check out the website for SQL Saturday 54, you will see that my topic is one of those that brings agony to many DBA’s – Documentation.  As I said in the abstract, I hope to share some scripts to help simplify some of the documentation tasks.

I am looking forward to this event and hope to see some of you there.  Here’s to hoping my presentation will be selected.  In the meantime, I will be working on another abstract for a second topic to present at SQLSat54.

page 1 of 1






Calendar
November 2014
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
Content
SQLHelp

SQLHelp


Welcome , today is Friday, November 21, 2014