Change SQL Server Collation – Back to Basics

One of my most favorite things in the world is the opportunity to deal with extremely varying database and environment requirements. Many vendors and databases seem to have a wide swath of different requirements. Some of the reasons for these requirements are absurd and some are not. That is a discussion for a different day.

When dealing with vendors, sometimes you get good documentation and requirements for the app. If you happen across one of these opportunities, you should consider buying a lottery ticket. Most of the time, the requirements and documentation are poorly assembled and then suffer from linguistic shortcomings.

What do you do when you run into poor documentation from a vendor? The typical answer would be to either call them or make a best guess (even if you call them, you are likely stuck with a best guess anyway). Then what do you do when you find that your best guess was completely wrong? Now it is time to back pedal and fix it, right?

When that mistake involves the server collation setting, the solution is simple – right? All you need to do is uninstall and reinstall SQL Server. That is the common solution and is frankly a horrific waste of time. This article will show some basics around fixing that problem quickly without a full reinstall.

I do hope that there is something you will be able to learn from this basics article. If you are curious, there are more basics articles on my blog – here.

Reinstall Prohibited

I am not a huge fan of wasting time doing something, especially if there is a more efficient way of achieving the same end result. I am not talking about cutting corners. If you cut corners, you likely just end up with having more work to do to fix the problems your sloppiness will have caused. That to me is not the same end result.

Having run into a bit of a problem with a vendor recently (with lacking requirements), I found myself with a server that was installed with the wrong collation instead of what the vendor wanted (never-mind they said nothing of it until a month after the server was setup and ready for them to use). The vendor needed the collation fixed immediately (basically it needed to be fixed yesterday). I really did not want to do a reinstall of the server and the sysadmins were just about to click through the uninstall and redo the install.

Oy Vey! Everybody hold up just a second here! First things first – verify with certainty there is good reason to need to change the server collation. It is perfectly legit to give the vendor the third degree here. Make sure they understand why they need the change. If they can answer the questions satisfactorily, then proceed with the change.

Next, just because the vendor says you have to uninstall/reinstall (or reboot) the server to make a certain change, does not mean they know what they are talking about. I have run into too many cases where the vendor thinks you must reboot the server to change the max memory setting in SQL Server (not true for sure).

Sure, common myth would say that you must reinstall SQL Server in order to change the default server collation. That is not entirely accurate. Reinstall is just one option that exists.

In the case of this vendor, they required that the SQL_Latin1_General_CP850_CS_AS collation be used. The server was set for SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS. So, let’s see how we can change the collation without a reinstall.

The first thing to do is to confirm the collation we have set.

We can see from these results that indeed the collation is wrong and we need to change it in order to comply with the request from the vendor. Next we will need to stop the SQL Server services.

I think that is pretty clear there what to do. As a reminder, the preferred method to stop and start SQL Server services is via the SQL Server Configuration Manager. We won’t do every start/stop from here for this article for good reason.

Once the services are stopped, then we need to open an administrative command prompt and navigate to the SQL Server binn directory as shown here.

This is for a default instance on SQL Server 2017. If you have a named instance or a different version of SQL Server, you will need to navigate the instance folder structure for your instance.

Next is where the magic happens. We enter a command similar to this:

Here is a quick summary of those flags in this command:

[-m] single user admin mode
[-T] trace flag turned on at startup
[-q] new collation to be applied

There are more such as -s available in books online for your perusal.

If you are curious what is up with those Trace Flags, pretty simple. TF4022 is to bypass startup procs. TF3659 on the other hand is supposed to write errors to the error log (at least in theory).

When the script starts, you will see something like the next two screens:

In the first, you can see that it says it is attempting to change the collation. In the second, just before the completion message, it states that the default collation was successfully changed. Let’s close this command prompt window and then go start SQL Server and validate the change.

And that is a successful change. See how easy that is? This effort takes all of maybe 5 minutes to complete (validation, starting, stopping and so on). I would take this over a reinstall on most days.

Now that we have changed the collation, all I need to do is repeat the process to set the collation back to what it was originally (in my test lab) and make sure to bookmark the process so I can easily look it up the next time.

There is a bit of a caveat to this. On each change of the collation, I ran into permissions issues with my default logging directory (where the sql error logs are written). I just needed to reapply the permissions and it was fine after that (SQL Server would not start). That said, the permissions issue was not seen on the box related to the change for the vendor. So just be mindful of the permissions just in case.

The Wrap

Every now and again we have to deal with a sudden requirements change. When that happens, we sometimes just need to take a step back and evaluate the entire situation to ensure we are proceeding down the right path. It is better to be pensive about the course of action rather than to knee jerk into the course of action. Do you want to spend 5 minutes on the solution or 30-40 minutes doing the same thing? Changing collation can be an easy change, or it can be one met with a bit of pain doing a reinstall (more painful if more user databases are present). Keep that in mind and keep cool when you need to make a sudden change.

This has been another post in the back to basics series. Other topics in the series include (but are not limited to): Backups, backup history and user logins.

SQL Server Extended Availability Groups

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: April 1, 2018

It may come as no surprise to many that Microsoft has hastened the SQL Server development cycle. Furthermore, it may be no surprise to many that Microsoft has also hastened the patch cycle for SQL Server.

If you were unaware of this, consider this as your notice that Microsoft has indeed hastened the patch cycle. Not only has the patch cycle become more rapid, the idea of Service Packs is more or less a notion of history at this point. Critical Updates (or CUs) is the new norm. This is a pretty good thing due in large part to the rapid improvements that can be made to the product due to Azure.

With all of this considered now, there is some really awesome news. A hint to this awesome news is in the preceding image and title of this post. In a recent CU for SQL Server 2017, Availability Groups and Extended Events both have seen massive upgrades. The upgrades are so big in fact that it is mind blowing. These upgrades were no small feat by any means and it took some major investment and cooperation from the likes of some well known competitors.

Upgrade the first: Availability Groups have now been extended to be able to include nodes from MySQL, PostGres and MariaDB. Frankly, I don’t understand the MariaDB move there but it’s all good. I am 100% on board with the MySQL addition and may have to work really hard to find a use case to include PostGres.

Imagine the realm of possibility this change brings!! First we got SQL Server on Linux and now we can include a predominantly Linux flavored DBMS in a SQL Server High Availability solution. LAMP engineers have got to be losing their gourds right about now over this. Microsoft is taking away every anti-MS premise that has been used in recent years and turning the world on its ears to become more global and reachable in the architecture and DBMS world.

Upgrade the second: In order to help support and troubleshoot AGs on these other platforms, we need some tools. The tools of choice happen to be in the form of Extended Events. While there is nothing quite yet in place on these other platforms to properly monitor an AG, XE is able to capture some MySQL, PostGres and MariaDB information as transmitted across the wire when these platforms are added to an AG. How COOL is that?

If you are really chomping at the bit, I recommend procuring the latest CU that was recently released. You can find that CU from this Microsoft site here.

The Wrap

I am in full support of this new direction from Microsoft. Partnering with other large platforms to provide a supremely improved overall product is very next level type of stuff and frankly quite unheard of in this ultra competitive world. It is so unheard of in fact that this was a nicely crafted April Fools joke. Happy April Fools Day!

Having mentioned Extended Events, if you are interested, I do recommend a serious read from any number of articles posted in 60 day series.

SQL Server User Already Exists – Back to Basics

One of my all-time favorite things in SQL Server is security. No matter what, it always seems that there is a new way to abuse permissions. When people abuse their access level or abuse the way permissions should be set in a SQL Server environment, we get the pleasure of both fixing it and then trying to educate them on why what they did was wrong and how to do it the right way.

In similar fashion, I previously wrote about some fundamental misconceptions about permissions here and here. I have to bring those specific articles up because this latest experience involves the basics discussed in those articles along with a different twist.

I do hope that there is something you will be able to learn from this basics article. If you are curious, there are more basics articles on my blog – here.

Gimme Gimme Gimme…

It is not uncommon to need to create a login and grant that login access to a database (or associate that login to a database user. In fact, that is probably a fairly routine process. It is so routine, that I have a demo script for it right here.

I even went as far as to include some of the very routine mistakes I see happening on a frequent basis (as referenced by a prior post here).

To this point, we only have a mild abuse of how to set permissions for a principal. Now it is time for that twist I mentioned. This user account needs to be created on a secondary server that is participating in either a mirror or an Availability Group. Most people will take that user account that was just created on the first server and then use the same script to add the account to the secondary server. Let’s see how that might look.

For this example, I will not go to the extent of creating the mirror or AG. Rather, I will pretend I am just moving the database to a new server. So I have taken a backup and then I will restore the database to the new server.

Next, let’s go ahead and recreate the login we created on the previous server.

You see here that I am only going to create the login if it does not exist already. Running the script produces the following for me.

Now, let’s deviate a bit and grant permissions for the login just like so many administrators will do.

It seems pretty apparent that my login that I just created does not have access to the GimmeSA database, right? Let’s go ahead and add permissions to the GimmeSA database and see what happens.

Well, that did not work according to plan right? Enter twist the second.

What I am seeing more and more of, is people at this point will just grant that login (that was just created) sysadmin rights. You can pick up your jaw now. Indeed! People are just granting the user SA permissions and calling it good. This practice will certainly work – or appear to work. The fact is, the problem is not fixed. This practice has only camouflaged the problem and it will come back at some future date. That date may be when somebody like me comes along and starts working on stripping non-essential sysadmins from the system.

There are two legitimate fixes for this particular problem (and no granting sysadmin is definitely not one of them). First you can run an orphan fix with a script such as this one by Ted Krueger. That will map the user that already exists in the database to the login principal (thus the reason for the error we saw). Or, you can prep your environment better by using the SID syntax with the create login as follows.

The trick here is to go and lookup the SID for the login on the old server first and then use that sid to create the login on the new server. This will preserve the user to login mappings and prevent the orphan user issue we just saw. It will also prevent the band-aid need of adding the login to the sysadmin server role.

The Wrap

In this article I have introduced you to some basics in regards to creating and synchronizing principals across different servers. Sometimes we try to shortcut the basics and apply band-aids that make absolutely no sense from either a practical point of view or a security point of view. Adhering to better practices will ease your administration burden along with improving your overall security presence.

This has been another post in the back to basics series. Other topics in the series include (but are not limited to): Backups, backup history and user logins.

SQL Server Configurations – Back to Basics

One thing that SQL Server does very well is come pre-configured in a lot of ways. These pre-configured settings would be called defaults. Having default settings is not a bad thing nor is it necessarily a good thing.

For me, the defaults lie somewhere in the middle ground and they are kind of just there. You see, having defaults can be good for a horde of people. On the other hand, the default settings can be far from optimal for your specific conditions.

The real key with default settings is to understand what they are and how to get to them. This article is going to go through some of the basics around one group of these defaults. That group of settings will be accessible via the sp_configure system stored procedure. You may already know some of these basics, and that is ok.

I do hope that there is something you will be able to learn from this basics article. If you are curious, there are more basics articles on my blog – here.

Some Assembly Required…

Three dreaded words we all love to despise but have learned to deal with over the past several years – some assembly required. More and more we find ourselves needing to assemble our own furniture, bookcases, barbecue grills, and bathroom sinks. We do occasionally want some form of set and forget it.

The problem with set it and forget it type of settings (or defaults) is as I mentioned – they don’t always work for every environment. We do occasionally need to manually adjust settings for what is optimal for that database, server, and/or environment.

When we fail to reconfigure the defaults, we could end up with a constant firefight that we just don’t ever seem to be able to win.

So how do we find some of these settings that can help us customize our environment for the better (or worse)? Let’s start taking a crack at this cool procedure called sp_configure! Ok, so maybe I oversold that a bit – but there is some coolness to it.

Looking at msdn about sp_configure I can see that it is a procedure to display or change global configuration settings for the current server.

If I run sp_configure without any parameters, I will get a complete result set of the configurable options via this procedure. Let’s look at how easy that is:

Ok, so that was exceptionally easy. I can see that the procedure returns the configurable settings, the max value for the setting, configured value, and the running value for each setting. That is basic information, right? If I want a little more detailed information, guess what? I can query a catalog view to learn even more about the configurations – sys.configurations.

That query will also show me (in addition to what I already know from sp_configure) a description for each setting, if the setting is a dynamic setting and whether or not the setting is an advanced configuration (and thus requires “show advanced options” to be enabled). Pro-tip: The procedure just queries the catalog view anyway. Here is a snippet from the proc text.

Seeing that we have some configurations that are advanced and there is this option called “show advanced options”, let’s play a little bit with how to enable or disable that setting.

With the result (on my system) being:

We can see there that the configuration had no effect because I already had the setting enabled. Nonetheless, the attempt to change still succeeded. Let’s try it a different way.

I ran a whole bunch of variations there for giggles. Notice how I continue to try different words or length of words until it finally errors? All of them have the same net effect (except the attempt that failed) they will change the configuration “show advanced options”. This is because all that is required (as portrayed in the failure message) is that the term provided is enough to make it unique. The uniqueness requirement (shortcut) is illustrated by this code block from sp_configure.

See the use of the wildcards and the “like” term? This is allowing us to shortcut the configuration name – as long as we use a unique term. If I select a term that is not unique, then the proc will output every configuration option that matches the term I used. From the example I used, I would get this output as duplicates to the term I used.

Ah, I can see the option I need! I can now just copy and paste that option (for the sake of simplicity) into my query and just proceed along my merry way. This is a great shortcut if you can’t remember the exact full config name or if you happen to be really bad at spelling.

The Wrap

In this article I have introduced you to some basics in regards to default server settings and how to quickly see or change those settings. Not every environment is able to rely on set-it and forget-it type of defaults. Adopting the mentality that “some assembly is required” with your environments is a good approach. It will help keep you on top of your configurations at the bare minimum. This article will help serve a decent foundation for some near future articles. Stay tuned!

This has been another post in the back to basics series. Other topics in the series include (but are not limited to): Backups, backup history and user logins.

Common Tempdb Trace Flags – Back to Basics

Once in a while I come across something that sounds fun or interesting and decide to dive a little deeper into it. That happened to me recently and caused me to preempt my scheduled post and work on writing up something entirely different. Why? Because this seemed like fun and useful.

So what is it I am yammering on about that was fun?

I think we can probably concede that there are some best practices flying around in regards to the configuration of tempdb. One of those best practices is in regards to two trace flags within SQL Server. These trace flags are 1117 and 1118. Here is a little bit of background on the trace flags and what they do.

A caveat I have now for the use of trace flags is that I err on the same side as Kendra (author of the article just mentioned). I don’t generally like to enable trace flags unless it is very warranted for a very specific condition. As Kendra mentions, TF 1117 will impact more than just the tempdb data files. So use that one with caution.

Ancient Artifacts

With the release of SQL Server 2016, these trace flags were rumored to be a thing of the past and hence completely unnecessary. That is partially true. The trace flag is unneeded and SQL 2016 does have some different behaviors, but does that mean you have to do nothing to get the benefits of these Trace Flags as implemented in 2016?

As it turns out, these trace flags no longer do what they did in previous editions. SQL Server now pretty much has it baked into the product. Buuuuut, do you have to do anything slightly different to make it work? This was something I came across while reading this post and wanted to double check everything. After all, I was also under the belief that it was automatically enabled. So let’s create a script that checks these things for me.

Holy cannoli batman – that is more than a simple script, right? Well, it may be a bit of overkill. I wanted it to work for version before and after and including SQL Server 2016 (when these sweeping changes went into effect). You see, I am checking for versions where the TF was required to make the change and also for versions after the change where the TF has no effect. In 2016 and later, these settings are database scoped and the TF is unnecessary.

The database scoped settings can actually be queried in 2016 more specifically with the following query.

In this query, I am able to determine if mixed_page_allocations and if is_autogrow_all_files are enabled. These settings can be retrieved from sys.databases and sys.filegroups respectively. If I run this query on a server where the defaults were accepted during the install, I would see something like the following.

You can see here, the default settings on my install show something different than the reported behavior. While autogrow all files is enabled, mixed_page_allocations is disabled. This matches what we expect to see by enabling the Trace Flags 1117 and 1118 – for the tempdb database at least. If I look at a user database, I will find that mixed pages is disabled by default still but that autogrow_all_files is also disabled.

In this case, you may or may not want a user database to have all data files grow at the same time. That is a great change to have implemented in SQL Server with SQL 2016. Should you choose to enable it, you can do so on a database by database basis.

As for the trace flags? My query checks to see if maybe you enabled them on your instance or if you don’t have them enabled for the older versions of SQL Server. Then the script generates the appropriate action scripts and allows you to determine if you want to run the generated script or not. And since we are changing trace flags (potentially) I recommend that you also look at this article of mine that discusses how to audit the changing of trace flags. And since that is an XEvent based article, I recommend freshening up on XEvents with this series too!

The Wrap

In this article I have introduced you to some basics in regards to default behaviors and settings in tempdb along with some best practices. It is advisable to investigate from time to time some of these recommendations and confirm what we are really being told so we can avoid confusion and mis-interpretation.

This has been another post in the back to basics series. Other topics in the series include (but are not limited to): Backups, backup history and user logins.

Changing Default Logs Directory – Back to Basics

Every now and then I find a topic that seems to fit perfectly into the mold of the theme of “Back to Basics”. A couple of years ago, there was a challenge to write a series of posts about basic concepts. Some of my articles in that series can be found here.

Today, my topic to discuss is in regards to altering the default logs directory location. Some may say this is no big deal and you can just use the default location used during install. Fair enough, there may not be massive need to change that location.

Maybe, just maybe, there is an overarching need to change this default. Maybe you have multiple versions of SQL Server in the enterprise and just want a consistent folder to access across all servers so you don’t have to think too much. Or possibly, you want to copy the logs from multiple servers to a common location on a central server and don’t want to have to code for a different directory on each server.

The list of reasons can go on and I am certain I would not be able to list all of the really good reasons to change this particular default. Suffice it to say, there are some really good requirements out there (and probably some really bad ones too) that mandate the changing of the default logs directory to a new standardized location.

Changes

The logs that I am referring to are not the transaction logs for the databases – oh no no no! Rather, I am referring to the error logs, the mini dumps, and the many other logs that may fall into the traditional “logs” folder during the SQL Server install. Let’s take a peek at a default log directory after the install is complete.

I picked a demo server that has a crap load of stuff available (and yeah not so fresh after install) but where the installation placed the logs by default. You can see I have traces, default XE files, some SQL logs, and some dump files. There is plenty going on with this server. A very fresh install would have similar files but not quite as many.

If I want to change the Log directory, it is a pretty easy change but it does require a service restart.

In SQL Server Configuration Manager, navigate to services then to “SQL Server Service”. Right click that service and select properties. From properties, you will need to select the “Startup Parameters” tab. Select the parameter with the “-e” and errorlog in the path. Then you can modify the path to something more appropriate for your needs and then simply click the update button. After doing that, click the ok button and bounce the SQL Service.

After you successfully bounce the service, you can confirm that the error logs have been migrated to the correct folder with a simple check. Note that this change impacts the errorlogs, the default Extended Events logging directory, the default trace directory, the dumps directory and many other things.

See how easy that was? Did that move everything over for us? As it turns out, it did not. The old directory will continue to have the SQL Agent logs. We can see this with a check from the Agent log properties like the following.

To change this, I can execute a simple stored procedure in the msdb database and then bounce the sql agent service.

With the agent logs now writing to the directory verified after agent service restart as shown here.

At this point, all that will be left in the previous folder will be the files that were written prior to the folder changes and the service restarts.

The Wrap

In this article I have introduced you to an easy method to move the logs for SQL Server and the SQL Server Agent to a custom directory that better suits your enterprise needs. This concept is a basic building block for some upcoming articles – stay tuned!

This has been another post in the back to basics series. Other topics in the series include (but are not limited to): Backups, backup history and user logins.

12 Days Of Christmas and SQL

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: No Comments
Published on: December 26, 2017

One of my all-time favorite times of the year happens to be the Christmas Season. I enjoy the season because it is supposed to remind us to try and be better people. And for me, it does help. In all honesty, it should be a better effort year round, but this is a good time of year to try and get back on track and to try and focus more on other more important things.

For me, one of the more important things is to try and help others. Focusing on other people and their needs helps them but also helps one’s self. It is because of the focus on others that I enjoy, not just Christmas Day, but also the 12 Days of Christmas.

The 12 Days of Christmas is about giving for 12 Days. Though, in this day and age, most view it as a span of 12 Days in which they are entitled to receive gifts. If we are giving for a mere 12 Days and not focusing on receiving, then wouldn’t we all be just a little bit happier? I know that when I focus more on the giving I am certainly happier.

Giving

In the spirit of the 12 Days of Christmas and Giving, I have a 12 Day series that I generally try to do each Holiday Season. The series will generally begin on Christmas day to align with the actual 12 Days of Christmas (rather than the adopted tradition of ending on Christmas). This also means that the series will generally end on the celebration of “Twelfth Night” which is January 5th.

Each annual series will include several articles about SQL Server and have a higher goal of trying to learn something more about SQL Server. Some articles may be deep technical dives, while others may prove to be more utilitarian with a script or some functionality that can be quickly put to use and frequently used. Other articles may just be for fun. In all, there will be several articles which I hope will bring some level of use for those that read while they strive to become better at this thing called SQL Server.

This page will serve as a landing page for each of the annual series and will be updated as new articles are added.

2017

  1. XE Permissions – 25 December 2017
  2. Best New(ish) SSMS Feature – 26 December 2017
  3. XE System Messages – 27 December 2017
  4. Correlate Trace and XE Events – 28 December 2017
  5. Audit Domain Group and User Permissions – 29 December 2017
  6. An Introduction to Templates – 30 December 2017
  7. Failed to Create the Audit File – 31 December 2017
  8. Correlate SQL Trace and Actions – 1 January 2018
  9. Dynamics AX Event Session – 2 January 2018
  10. Sharepoint Diagnostics and XE – 3 January 2018
  11. Change Default Logs Directory – 4 January 2018
  12. Common Tempdb Trace Flags – Back to Basics (Day of Feast) – 5 January 2018

2015

  1. Failed – 25 December 2015
  2. Failed – 26 December 2015
  3. Failed – 27 December 2015
  4. Failed – 28 December 2015
  5. Failed – 29 December 2015
  6. Log Files from Different Source – 30 December 2015
  7. Customize XEvent Log Display – 31 December 2015
  8. Filtering Logged Data – 1 January 2016
  9. Hidden GUI Gems – 2 January 2016
  10. Failed – 3 January 2016
  11. Failed – 4 January 2016
  12. A Day in the Stream – 5 January 2016

2013

  1. Las Vegas Invite – 25 December 2013
  2. SAN Outage – 26 December 2013
  3. Peer to Peer Replication – 27 December 2013
  4. Broken Broker – 28 December 2013
  5. Peer Identity – 29 December 2013
  6. Lost in Space – 30 December 2013
  7. Command N Conquer – 31 December 2013
  8. Ring in the New Year – 1 January 2014
  9. Queries Going Boom – 2 January 2014
  10. Retention of XE Session Data in a Table – 3 January 2014
  11. Purging syspolicy – 4 January 2014
  12. High CPU and Bloat in Distribution – 5 January 2014

2012 (pre-Christmas)

  1. Maint Plan Logs – 13 December 2012
  2. Service Broker Out of Control – 14 December 2012
  3. Backup, Job and Mail History Cleanup – 15 December 2012
  4. Exercise for msdb – 16 December 2012
  5. Table Compression – 17 December 2012
  6. Maintenance Plan Gravage – 18 December 2012
  7. Runaway Jobs – 19 December 2012
  8. SSRS Schedules – 20 December 2012
  9. Death and Destruction, err Deadlocks – 21 December 2012
  10. Virtual Storage – 22 December 2012
  11. Domain Setup – 23 December 2012
  12. SQL Cluster on Virtual Box – 24 December 2012

Seattle SQL Pro Workshop 2017 Schedule

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: No Comments
Published on: October 26, 2017

db_resuscitateSeattle SQL Pro Workshop 2017

You may be aware of an event that some friends and I are putting together during the week of PASS Summit 2017. I have created an Eventbrite page with all the gory details here.

With everybody being in a mad scramble to get things done to pull this together, the one task we left for last was to publish a schedule. While this is coming up very late in the game, rest assured we are not foregoing some semblance of order for the day. 😉 That said, there will still be plenty of disorder / fun to be had during the day.

So the entire point of this post is to publish the schedule and have a landing page for it during the event. *

Session Start Duration Presenter Topic
Registration 8:30 AM All
Intro/Welcome 9:00 AM 10 Jason Brimhall  
1 9:10 AM 60 Jason Brimhall Dolly, Footprints and a Dash of EXtra TimE
Break 10:10 AM 5    
2 10:15 AM 60 Jimmy May Intro to Monitoring I/O: The Counters That Count
Break 11:15 AM 5    
3 11:20 AM 60 Gail Shaw Parameter sniffing and other cases of the confused optimiser
Lunch 12:20 PM 60   Networking /  RG
4 1:20 PM 60 Louis Davidson Implementing a Hierarchy in SQL Server
Break 2:20 PM 5    
5 2:25 PM 60 Andy Leonard Designing an SSIS Framework
Break 3:25 PM 5    
6 3:30 PM 60 Wayne Sheffield What is this “SQL Inj/stuff/ection”, and how does it affect me?
Wrap 4:30 PM 30   Swag and Thank You
END 5:00 PM Cleanup

*This schedule is subject to change without notice.

Seattle SQL Pro Workshop 2017

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: No Comments
Published on: October 19, 2017

Seattle SQL Pro Workshop 2017

October is a great time of year for the SQL Server and Data professional. There are several conferences but the biggest happens to be in the Emerald City – Seattledb_resuscitate

Some friends and I have come together the past few years to put on an extra day of learning leading up to this massive conference. We call it the Seattle SQL Pro Workshop. I have created an Eventbrite page with all the gory details here.

That massive conference I have mentioned – you might have heard of it as well. It is called PASS Summit and you can find out a wealth of info from the website. Granted there are plenty of paid precon events sanctioned by PASS, we by no means are competing against them. We are trying to supplement the training and offer an extra avenue to any who could not attend the paid precons or who may be in town for only part of the day on Tuesday.

This year, we have a collision of sorts with this event. We are holding the event on Halloween – Oct 31, 2017. With it being Halloween, we welcome any who wish to attend the workshop in FULL costume.

So, what kinds of things will we cover at the event? I am glad you asked. Jimmy May will be there to talk about IO. Gail Shaw will be talking about the Query Optimizer (QO). Louis (Dr. SQL) will be taking us deep into Hierarchies. Andy Leonard will be exploring BIML and Wayne Sheffield will be showing us some SQL Injection attacks.

That is the 35,000 foot view of the sessions. You can read more about them from the EventBrite listing – HERE. What I do not yet have up on the is what I will be discussing.

My topic for the workshop will be hopefully something as useful and informative as the cool stuff everybody else is putting together. I will be sharing some insights about a tool from our friends over at Red-Gate that can help to change the face of the landscape in your development environments. This tool as illustrated so nicely by my Trojan Sheep, is called SQL Clone.

I will demonstrate the use of this tool to reduce the storage footprint required in Dev, Test, Stage, QA, UAT, etc etc etc. Based on client case study involving a 2TB database, we will see how this tool can help shrink that footprint to just under 2{529e71a51265b45c1f7f96357a70e3116ccf61cf0135f67b2aa293699de35170} – give or take. I will share some discoveries I met along the way and I even hope to show some internals from the SQL Server perspective when using this technology (can somebody say Extended Events to the Rescue?).

Why Attend?

Beyond getting some first rate training from some really awesome community driven types of data professionals, this is a prime opportunity to network with the same top notch individuals. These people are more than MVPs. They are truly technical giants in the data community.

This event gives you an opportunity to learn great stuff while at the same time you will have the chance to network on a more personal level with many peers and professionals. You will also have the opportunity to possibly solve some of your toughest work or career related problems. Believe me, the day spent with this group will be well worth your time and money!

Did I mention that the event is Free (with an optional paid lunch)?

Seattle SQL Pro Workshop 2016

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: No Comments
Published on: October 23, 2016

db_resuscitateSeattle SQL Pro Workshop 2016

You may be aware of an event that some friends and I are putting together during the week

of PASS Summit 2016. I have listed the event details within the EventBrite page here.

As we near the actual event, I really need to get the schedule published (epic fail in getting it out sooner).

So the entire point of this post is to publish the schedule and have a landing page for it during the event.

Session Start Duration Presenter Topic
Registration 8:30 AM All
Intro/Welcome 9:00 AM 10 Jason Brimhall  
1 9:10 AM 60 Grant Fritchey Azure with RG Data Platform Studio
Break 10:10 AM 5    
2 10:15 AM 60 Tjay Belt PowerBI from a DBA
Break 11:15 AM 5    
3 11:20 AM 60 Wayne Sheffield SQL 2016 and Temporal Data
Lunch 12:20 PM 60   Networking /  RG
4 1:20 PM 60 Chad Crawford Impact Analysis – DB Change Impact of that Change
Break 2:20 PM 5    
5 2:25 PM 60 Gail Shaw Why are we Waiting?
Break 3:25 PM 5    
6 3:30 PM 60 Jason Brimhall XEvent Lessons Learned from the Day
Wrap 4:30 PM 30   Swag and Thank You
END 5:00 PM Cleanup

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