Internal Tables and Space Used

Categories: News, Professional, Scripts, SSC
Comments: No Comments
Published on: July 29, 2015

engine_indbSome of the beauty of SQL Server is the complexity that it holds. Some of that complexity is right before our eyes. And some of that requires a little bit of diving into the internals to figure out what is happening or even why it is complex.

I enjoy the complexity that is offered to us through this great technology. Because of some of the hidden complexity, I found myself in a rabbit hole recently trying to figure out what exactly was happening with how table size is being calculated by default.

I have written previously on how to find some of the information pertinent to table size. And sadly, thanks to recent rabbit hole excursions, I found that some of the information in the previous articles was wrong (and accordingly there is even a bit of an error in some documentation but that is a different story – connect filed here).

One of the most common means to calculate size in a database is through the use of sp_spaceused. Over the recent editions, there have been a few minor updates to this stored procedure. But a common theme in every update has been to reference the sys.internal_tables system table to get some internal_types excluded from certain calculations.

I found myself wanting to know just exactly what these internal_types were. I searched BOL and Google. I found some references to some of the table types but they always seemed to just be in code. There was a short list in BOL that had some information, but it was far from complete. What to do? What to do?

What did I do?

Since I couldn’t find all of the internal_types for the internal_tables, I was left to do but one last thing. Well, actually, I resorted to asking around a bit first. I asked a group of MCMs and some people (e.g. Paul Randal – b|t ) for a little help. After those inquiries, I found myself still short of a complete list. That is, complete as far as the exclusion list for sp_spaceused.

My last resort for the time being was to begin testing. I tested various different features and configurations. I did this until I was able to come up with a complete list (with regard to sp_spaceused again). In addition to that complete list, I found a handful of additional internal table types.

Now this investigation and rabbit hole was not just for my own enjoyment. I have to admit it was rather frustrating. I ran into test failure after test failure trying to find the exact internal table types that were referenced in that blasted stored procedure.

I was asked by a friend (blog | twitter) why I was submitting myself to this kind of pain and why it was so important. Well, it’s not just for my enjoyment. SPOILER ALERT: I have an update for the table space script that was planned, and it needs to have a little bit better information in lieu of the “because it says so in BOL” explanation that I had made in previous releases of the script.

But I digress. That will all be better discussed in the next installment of the script. As for today, I want to share my findings of this expedition into the nooks and crannies of the database engine.

The script

I have hard-coded a few things in this script that you will possibly need to change. The most important being that I hard-coded a reference to the AdminDB database to the string splitter that I use. There is a note of that string-splitter in the script. And to use the same one (By Jeff Moden with Community contributions) that I have employed, you can download it from here.

You can see that I have included the types for versions from 2005 through 2016 that I have found to date. In addition, SQL Server 2016 has the same exclusions (for now) as 2012 and 2014. That is, at least within sp_spaceused. In 2016, sp_spaceused does make a call to an extended stored proc called sp_spaceused_remote_data_archive, and I do not yet know what is within that proc. You can bet though, that it is related to the new Stretch feature.

The Tease!

Stay tuned! The new release for the table space script will be coming to you on the other side of this short blogging break!

Last Execution of a Proc

SQL Server is full of good stuff.  There are plenty of features to be used.  Plenty of applications to help it.  And there is even plenty of metadata within SQL Server to help you better understand your data and the queries that are being run.

It just so happens that a couple of clients requested some information on this additional metadata.  Both of the clients wanted something just a little different from the other.  After a little bit of thought, it came pretty clearly that what they wanted was definitely available within SQL Server.  The first client simply wanted to know the last time a procedure had been executed.  That is relatively easy enough – granted the procedure has been executed and granted the execution statistics have not been evicted.

The second client also wanted to know some information about the execution of a stored procedure.  But this time, they wanted to get the execution plan.  There are a few ways to trap an execution plan.  You could either run a trace, an XE session, or you could execute the query and grab the plan.  But if you didn’t already have an XE session running or a trace running and the client does not want you to execute the query to trap that plan?

Well, that is not a problem because SQL Server stores this stuff.  As long as the query and plan have not been evicted from the plan cache then you can get the metadata you desire.

Metadata to the Rescue

The metadata that we seek happens to be accessible through the use of several dynamic management views.  These are sometimes called dynamic management objects and are great to use to get to know your data and environment.  This time around, I am mostly interested in the following dynamic management objects: sys.dm_exec_query_statssys.dm_exec_cached_planssys.dm_exec_sql_text , and sys.dm_exec_query_plan.  I am using these objects because I want to trap execution stats along with the query SQL statement as well as the cached plan for that query.

So this is what I came up with to aid each of the clients in getting the data they sought.

Pretty simple and straight forward.  Now, I have this quick query to find the last time a proc was run, as well as a means to trap the execution plan for that query.  If I run that query, I would be able to see something like the following.

Capture

I hope this is useful to you and hope you enjoy.

Trapping Online Index Operations

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 4 Comments
Published on: January 29, 2015

Recently I wrote an article about Capturing Online Index Operations.  In that article, I discussed a problem that I had encountered.  Well, there were multiple problems.  One was an issue with a vendor app that had some hidden module that was performing online index defrags that was causing corruption in a couple of indexes every night.

The second of the issues was not vendor related but more to do with pain I was experiencing with getting the XEvent session I was creating to work properly.  The problem, as I had concluded, was that it would not work to an asynchronous file target.  As it turns out, I finally got it working.

Today, I just want to share that solution.  Being able to store the results to a file target offers a few benefits (less memory consumed and persisted data) that makes it far more ideal for this problem than to use the ring buffer.

For more background on the full issue and a demonstration on the output of the data from this session, please visit the original post on SQL Solutions Group.

And for the query to parse the data that is stored, you can use something like this next query.

I hope you find this useful.  But before you proceed, I do have a caution to throw out there.  This session is dependent on the file system directory of C:\Database\XE to exist.  If it does not, you will get a nasty error message.  Despite the error message, the session will create.  And since the session creates, when you try to run the next query, you will get an additional error because the file does not exist since the path does not exist.

Why does the session still create despite an error you ask?  Well, the answer to that is due to the existence of the ring_buffer target that is also specified.  I left that in there despite not needing it. You can safely remove the ring_buffer target in this XEvent session.  If you remove that ring_buffer target and do not have the directory previously noted, then the session will not create once the error is reached.

Ghosts – an eXtrasensory Experience

ghostrip_fireThis is the last article in a mini-series diving into the existence of ghosts and how to find them within your database.

So far this has been a fun and rewarding dive into Elysium to see and chat with these entities.  We have unearthed some means to be able to see these things manifesting themselves in the previous articles.  You can take a look at the previous articles here.

For this article, I had planned to discuss another undocumented method to look into the ghost records and their existence based on what was said on an msdn blog.  But after a lot of research, testing and finally reaching out to Paul Randal, I determined that won’t work.  So that idea was flushed all the way to Tartarus.

Let it be made very clear that DBTABLE does not offer a means to see the ghosts.  Paul and I agree that the other article that mentioned DBTABLE really should have been referring to DBCC Page instead.

Despite flushing the idea to Tartarus, it was not a fruitless dive.  It just was meaningless for the purpose of showing ghosts via that DBCC command.  I still gained value from the dive!!

All of that said, the remainder of the plan still applies and it should be fun.

Really, at this point what is there that hasn’t been done about the ghosts?  Well, if you are well tuned to these apparitions, you may have received the urge to explore them with Extended Events – sometimes called XE for short.

As has been done in the past, before we board Charon’s boat to cross the River Styx to Hades to find these ghosts in Elysium, one really needs to run the setup outlined here.

With the framework in place, you are now ready to explore with XE.

Look at that! There are several possible events that could help us track these ghosts.  Or at the least we could get to know how these ghosts are handled deep down in the confines of Hades, err I mean the database engine.

Ghost_XE

 

From these possible events, I opted to work with ghost_cleanup and ghost_cleanup_task_process_pages_for_db_packet.  The sessions I defined to trap our ghost tracks are as follows.

You can see there are two sessions defined for this trip down the Styx.  Each session aptly named for our journey.  The first (GhostHunt) is defined to trap ghost_cleanup and sends that information to a histogram target.  The second (SoulSearch) is defined to use the other event, and is configured to send to the ring_buffer.  Since the second event has a “count” field defined as a part of the event, it will work fine to just send it to the ring buffer for later evaluation.

Once I have the traps, I mean event sessions defined, I can now resume the test harness from the delete step as was previously done in previous articles.  The following Delete is what I will use.

Prior to running that delete though, I checked the Event Session data to confirm a starting baseline.  Prior to the delete, I had the following in my histogram target.

 

predelete_count

 

After running the delete, and checking my histogram again, I see the following results.

post_count

 

You can see from this that in addition to the 25 pre-existing ghosts, we had another 672 ghosts (666 of which were from the delete).

This is how I was able to investigate the GhostHunt Extended Event Histogram.

But what about looking at the other event session?

Let’s look at how we can go and investigate that session first and then look at some of the output data.

ghostclean

 

Cool!  Querying the SoulSearch session has produced some information for various ghosts in the database.  Unlike the histogram session that shows how many ghosts have been cleaned, this session shows us some page ids that could contain some ghosts – in the present.  I can take page 1030111 for instance and examine the page with DBCC PAGE as follows.

 

 

pagealtLook at that page and result!! We have found yet another poltergeist.

RIP

Once again we have been able to journey to the depths of the Database engine and explore the ghosts that might be there.  This just happens to illustrate a possible means to investigate those ghosts.  That said, I would not necessarily run these types of event sessions on a persistent basis.  I would only run these sessions if there seems to be an issue with the Ghost cleanup or if you have a strong penchant to learn (on a sandbox server).

Some good information can be learned.  It can also give a little insight into how much data is being deleted on a routine basis from your database.  As a stretch, you could even possibly use something like this to get a handle on knowing the data you support.  Just be cautious with the configuration of the XE and understand that there could be a negative impact on a very busy server.  And certainly proceed at your own risk.

Database Ghosts

phantasmripRecently you may have seen my first article on this topic over at SQL Solutions Group.  If not, here is the link so you can read that article first before proceeding here.  This article is intended as a first of two part follow-up to that article.

Now that you have read that other article, we can recap it a little bit.

You will recall that in that article, I discussed the presence of Ghosts in your database.  I also discussed that those ghosts are a good thing.  They have some benefits to them, of which is a bit of a performance boost for some operations like the rollback of a delete.

In that article I discussed one method with which you could see these ghost records.  In this article, I would like to share an alternate method to be able to see these ghosts.

In order to explore this alternate means, let’s go ahead and follow the first few steps from the other article to get the setup complete so our second ghost hunting foray can begin.

Now with the setup complete, we should once again confirm that we have appropriate data available for the hunt.  Once again a simple query can suffice to show the data.

Upon execution of the check script, we should see something similar to the following data-set.

datasample

 

Great, the data is confirmed and we should have a wonderful chance to find some ghosts once again.  In the previous attempt, we needed an additional plasma blaster in the form of a trace flag.  In this attempt we will hunt these ghosts without that tool and see what we can find.  Why attempt it in this way?  Well, it is simply because I’d rather not use a trace flag if it is not necessary.  If you recall, that trace flag had a couple of noted effects.  One of the effects was that it turned off the ghost cleanup process.  If I can avoid it, I’d rather leave the containment unit in tact.

Now, due to that clerical error of putting Halloween on the wrong date, we need to follow the prescribed policy to delete records prior to creating the proper records.

Notice that we issued the delete in a transaction this time around.  We are going to leave that transaction open for a bit while we hunt those ghosts.

The first step is to verify that some ghosts might be present.  To do that we should run a query such as the following.

From that query we should see something like the following.

idxstats_ghosts

Once again we are on the right track.  We can further confirm the existence of these ghosts through a little more investigation and monitoring.  Let’s try the trick with the dblog function again.

With that query, we should see something like the following result set.

dblog_ghosts

 

Very cool.  We once again can see that these phantasms are in the database.  We have enough information that we can proceed on to the next stage.  We can pass the PageID into DBCC PAGE in order to investigate the ghosts on the page.  If we use the PageID that is circled with the green in the preceding result set, we can get a better feel for these specters.

And we may see results such as the following.

page_ghosts2

Recall that the log says this page has ghost records on it.  When we check the page with DBCC PAGE we can definitely see that there are ghosts on the page.  This is very cool.  Now, had we tried to check for ghost records on the PFS page we would not be able to see the ghost count like we were able to see by enabling the TF.

Once again we have been able to display the existence of ghosts in the database.  In order to get these ghosts to move on from the database to their afterlife, we merely need to commit the transaction or roll back the transaction.

Stay tuned for the next article in this mini-series about ghosts.  Who knows, we may even have a bonus Halloween article since this is Halloween month.

Part III of the series can now be found here.

page 1 of 1








Calendar
November 2017
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  
Content
SQLHelp

SQLHelp


Welcome , today is Friday, November 17, 2017