T-SQL Tuesday #081: Recap

Comments: 4 Comments
Published on: August 18, 2016

Sharpen Something

sqlskillsharpener_pigIn case you missed it (many did), TSQL Tuesday was a challenging event this month. I invited people to do a put a little more into writing a post than what they may usually do. There were some very good reasons for this. If you are interested, take a look back at the invite and see if you maybe want to give it a go outside the bounds of TSQL Tuesday. You can check out the original post here.

Before I get into the nitty gritty I have a confession. This topic was a reminder for myself as much as it was a challenge to others to help me continue to drive and improve in various areas as I see fit.

There are other dirty little secrets too. Some may become apparent as you read through the recap.

Recap of the Event

One of the tricks to becoming and staying a top tier data talent or professional is a perpetual cycle to learn, adapt, change, and evolve. We must be in a continual cycle of self evaluation and self modification. Let’s call this by something else – we must be agile. There I said the five letter word. Think about it in broad strokes with your career – it is a development process with perpetual evaluation, review and tweaks.

Now think about the invite and see how that fits with what I just said or with the, cough cough, agile flow. You start (albeit very basically) with a need for enhancement, then you plan which pieces of the enhancement you can accomplish, you then do the work (whether successful or not), then after you deliver the work you conclude with a retrospective (what went well and what needs to change). Yes! I do feel rather dirty for sneaking this on everybody like this. That said, when you think about the model and apply it in broad strokes to your career path – it has merit.

Another way of viewing this is to think in terms of the following flowchart to help improve your personal mindset or maybe improve your personal mental power. The process is repetitive and follows a natural course. Once you have acted on some plan, you must review the performance and results and then gauge where your mindset needs to go from there to improve.

mindset_improvement_560

Rob Farley Steve Jones Robert Davis Kenneth Fisher Kennie Nybo Pontoppidan Mala Mahadevan Wayne Sheffield Jason Brimhall

In other Words

Did you just look at the picture or did you explore the picture? If you hover the picture, you will find there are links to this months participants. There were only eight so not a ton of exploration is necessary.

Here are my thoughts on each of the posts submitted this month:

Wayne Sheffield (blog | twitter) – You can find his link in the big arrow that restarts the cycle. I put his link here because he ran into a ton of blockers during his experiment and he is at a spot of practically restarting – again. This is not the first time he has restarted in his quest to learn more about Availability Groups. Wayne fully admits he is deficient in AG and states near the end of the post that he had to humble himself going through this exercise. That is awesome! We could all use a little humility on a more regular basis.

Mala Mahadevan (blog | twitter) – You can find her link in the “Results” circle. The reason for this choice is that Mala discusses her midlife crisis – erm career change. MTSQL2sDay150x150ala held out for quite a while looking for just the right opportunity. When it came, she snatched it up. Along with that career change, she has implemented a plan to become more active in blogging and to learn more and more through various avenues. The increase in blogging and the ability to stick to her guns resulted in a new job/career she seems to be happy with at the moment.

Robert Davis (blog | twitter) – Robert found himself placed in the performance circle thanks to his article involving a third party backup utility that should be heavy on the performance side. Robert needed something interesting to push him to reacquaint himself with this tool. Once he found that project that required just a touch of ingenuity, performance and a way to avoid the GUI, Robert found himself right at home with a great solution for his environment.

Kennie Nybo Pontoppidan (blog | twitter) – Kennie landed in the Actions node mostly because he decided to take the challenge and act on his long time desire to get better at the new temporal features. To do that, he decided to read a book by Snodgrass which seriously sounded like something from Harry Potter to me. Kennie outlines a bunch of information that he learned from the book such as tracking time based data from either a transaction or valid-time perspective.

personal_growth_brain

Kenneth Fisher (blog | twitter) – I placed this one into the behavior node. Maybe it is a bit of a stretch, but it seems to make sense since he discussed some behavioral differences between Azure DB and SQL Server. Things just do not work exactly the same between the two. You will need to understand these differences if you find yourself in a spot where you must work with both.

Steve Jones (blog | twitter) – When looking through the image, you will find that Steve landed solidly in the mindset node. When I read his contribution, I got the full impression that his mind was 100% in the right place. He set out to learn something and try to get better at it. Additionally, he blogged about a topic that is near and dear to me – Extended Events. Have I mentioned before that I have a lot of content about XE? You can read a bunch of it here. Like Wayne, Steve was humble near the end of his article. He notes that he was clumsy as he started working with XE but that he is glad he did it as well. Read his article. He gave me a great idea of another use for XE and I am sure it may sound good to you too!

Rob Farley (blog | twitter) – I planted Rob firmly on the attitude node. It seems clear to me that Rob had loads of attitude throughout his article about Operational Analytics. The attitude I perceived was that of humility and yearning. Rob feels like he has a lot to learn and his attitude is in the right place it seems to keep him going while he tries to learn more in the field of Operational Analytics.

My Contribution link can be found by clicking on any spot in the image that is not already described. I wrote about my experiences with trying to pick up a little on JSON.

That is a wrap of all eight contributions. If you did not contribute this month, I recommend that you still try to do something with the challenge issued with this months TSQL Tuesday.

Edit: Added links to the articles with each persons name in the event this page is being viewed with Firefox. There seems to be an issue with the links in the image map within Firefox.

T-SQL Tuesday #081: Getting Sharper

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Published on: August 16, 2016

Sharpen Something

sqlskillsharpener_pigThis month I am the host of the TSQL Tuesday blog party. In the invite, which can be read here, I asked people to decide on something to work on, plan out and then report the success/failure.

Not only am I the host, but I am a member this month. In my invite (and the reminder) I provided a few examples of what I was really looking for from participants this month. It became apparent that the topic may have been over thought. So, for my contribution, I decided to do something extremely simple.

There is so much about SQL Server that it would not be feasible nor should it be expected that one single person should know everything about the product. That said, within SQL Server alone, all of us have something to learn and improve upon within our skill-set. If we extend out to the professional development realm, we have even more we can explore as a skill sharpening experiment for this month.

I am going to keep it strictly within the SQL Server realm this month. I have chosen to develop my skills a little more with the topic of JSON. I should be an expert in JSON, but since it is spelled incorrectly – maybe I have something to learn. That said, I really do love being in the database now – haha.

JSON

katanaLet’s just get this out there right now – I suck at JSON. I suck at XML. The idea of querying a non-normalized document to get the data is not very endearing to me. It is for that reason that I have written utilities or scripts to help generate my XML shredding scripts – as
can be seen here.

Knowing that I have this allergy to features similar to XML, I need to build up some resistance to the allergy through a little learning and a little practice. Based on that, my plan is pretty simple:

  1. Read up on JSON
  2. Find some tutorials on JSON
  3. Practice using the feature
  4. Potentially do something destructive with JSON

With that plan set before me, it is time to sharpen some skills and then slice, dice, and maybe shred some JSON.

Sharpening

Nothing in this entire process was actually too terribly difficult. That is an important notion to understand. My plan was very lacking in detail and really just had broad strokes. This helps me to be adaptable to changing demands and time constraints. I dare say the combination of broad strokes and a very limited scope also allowed me an opportunity for easier success.

Researching JSON was pretty straight forward. This really meant a few google searches. There was a little bit of time spent reading material from other blogs, a little bit from BOL and a little bit from msdn. Nothing extravagant here. I did also have the opportunity to review some slides from a Microsoft presentation on the topic. Again, not terribly difficult or demanding in effort or time requirement. This research covers both steps one and two in the plan.

Now comes the more difficult task. It was time to put some of what had been seen and read to practice. A little experimentation was necessary. I have two easy enough looking examples that I was able to construct to start experimenting with in my learning endeavors.

Here is the first example. This is a bit more basic in construct. (Updated to use an image since the json was messing with the rss feed and causing malformed xml.)

json_xmpl

And some basic results:

basic_json

Pretty slick. Better yet is that this is many times easier than XML.

How about something a little different like the following:

Admittedly, this one is a bit more of a hack. In my defense, I am still learning how to work with this type of stuff. At any rate, I had an array of values for one  of the attributes. The kludge I used reads up to 3 values from that array and returns those values into individual attributes. I am still learning in this area so I can live with this for now.

array_json

The last part of the plan involved doing something destructive. Why? Well just for the fun of it. I was unable to get to this stage but it is still in the plans.

TSQL2sDay150x150Report on The Successes and Failures

 

I have written about some of the successes and failures along the way thus far. Overall, I would rate this a successful endeavor. The big reason for it being a success is because I do feel I learned more about json within SQL Server than I had prior to the experiment.

Taking a bite sized chunk of learning and acting on it sure makes it a lot easier to learn a new concept or to learn more about such a vast topic such as SQL Server.

*Note: This is a late publish because the post didn’t auto post. This is a tad late but I discovered it as I was prepping the roundup.

T-SQL Tuesday #081: Sharpen Something – Reminder

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Published on: August 2, 2016

Sharpen Something

sqlskillsharpener_pigLast week I sent out the invite for the August TSQL Tuesday blog party. In that invite I promised to send out a reminder seven days prior to the event. Well – it is that time.

You are cordially invited to read the invite for TSQL Tuesday 81 and plan your entry for the party.

In the invite, I shared the details for the event including examples of what I am looking for as an entry for the event.

I hope we will be seeing you next Tuesday, August 9th in attendance at this month’s party. I am sure it will prove to be an interesting experience one way or another.

Bonus Example

In the original invite I provided a list of examples of what one could do for this TSQL Tuesday. Today, I am providing one more example in a slightly different format. Recall that the invite requested that participants set out to accomplish something, make a plan and report on that “goal”, the plan, and the outcome.

So, let’s say I have discovered that I write too much in the passive voice. Based on that information, I would like to overcome the passivity in my writing voice, therefore my goal would be to learn how to write more assertively (less passively). In order to accomplish that goal, I may need to read up on the topic and learn exactly what it means to write passively. Then I would need to examine articles that I have written. And then I would need to practice writing more assertively. After all of that is done, I may have somebody (or something) analyze a brand new article or two to determine if I have achieved my desire.

After having executed on that plan, I will write about the experience including what the initial goal and plan were and also on what worked or didn’t work while trying to reach that goal. To summarize, here is an outline of that example:

What I will Accomplish

I will learn how to write more assertively (or just Write more assertively)

How Will I do that

Research what it means to write passively

Research what it means to write assertively

Evaluate “assertively” written articles

Take Notes on how to write assertively

Evaluate my articles

Practice writing assertively

Write a new article and have it reviewed to judge the voice whether it seems too passive or not

Report on The Successes and Failures

Write whether or not each step succeeded or failed.

Write if a step was unnecessary

Write about the experience and your thoughts about the experience.

Did you achieve or fail overall?

What is T-SQL Tuesday?

TSQL2sDay150x150T-SQL Tuesday is a monthly blog party hosted by a different blogger each month. This blog party was started by Adam Machanic (blog|twitter). You can take part by posting your own participating post that fits the topic of the month and follows the requirements below. Additionally, if you are interested in hosting a future T-SQL Tuesday, contact Adam Machanic on his blog.

How to Participate

  • Your post must be published between 00:00 GMT Tuesday, Août 9e, 2016, and 00:00 GMT Wednesday Août 10e, 2016.
  • Your post must contain the T-SQL Tuesday logo from above and the image should link back to this blog post.
  • Trackbacks should work. But, please do add a link to your post in the comments section below so everyone can see your work.
  • Tweet about your post using the hash tag #TSQL2sDay.

T-SQL Tuesday #081: Sharpen Something

Comments: 11 Comments
Published on: July 27, 2016

Sharpen Something

It has now been 30 months since the last time I hosted a TSQL Tuesday, that was TSQL Tuesday 51. I recapped that event here with the original invite here. I can’t believe it has been that long since I last hosted. It only seems like yesterday.

sqlskillsharpener_pigComing into the present day, we are now at TSQL Tuesday 81. For this month, I would like to try and up the ante a bit. Usually we only get about a weeks notice prior to the event to think about the article to write for the event.

This time, I want to invite everybody just a little bit sooner and will follow-up with a reminder seven days prior to the event. The reason I want to do this is because I think this may be a touch more difficult this time.

 

This month I am asking you to not only write a post but to do a little homework – first. In other words, plan to do something, carry out that plan, and then write about the experience. There is a lot going into that last sentence. Because of that, let me try to explain through a few examples of what I might like to see. Hopefully these examples will help you understand the intent and how this month the topic relates to “Sharpening Something“.

EXAMPLES

  1. You have learned about a really cool feature called Azure DevTest Lab. Having heard about it, you wish to implement this feature to solve some need in your personal development or corporate environment. Develop a plan to implement the feature and tell us the problem it solves and about your experiences in getting it to work from start to end. An example of how I might try to use this might involve the creation of a disposable and easy setup environment for Precons, Workshops, and various other types of training.
  2. There is a really awesome book about SQL Server you heard about and you decided to buy it. Plan to sit down and read the book. Take a nugget or two from the book and tell us how you can use that nugget of information within your personal or professional environment.
  3. You know you are extremely deficient at a certain SQL Skill. Tell me what that skill is and develop a plan to get better at that skill. Report on the implementation of this skill and how you are doing at improving. Maybe that skill is about Extended Events, PoSH or availability groups.
  4. Similar to the skill deficiency, you know you do not understand a certain concept within SQL Server as well as you feel you should. Maybe that concept is indexing or statistics (for example). Create a two week plan to become more proficient at that concept. Follow that plan and report on your progress.

In recap, this is an invite to make a short term goal covering the next two weeks. Tell everybody what that goal is (in your tsql tuesday post of course) and how you went about creating a plan for that goal and how you have progressed during the two week interval.

What is T-SQL Tuesday?

TSQL2sDay150x150T-SQL Tuesday is a monthly blog party hosted by a different blogger each month. This blog party was started by Adam Machanic (blog|twitter). You can take part by posting your own participating post that fits the topic of the month and follows the requirements below. Additionally, if you are interested in hosting a future T-SQL Tuesday, contact Adam Machanic on his blog.

How to Participate

  • Your post must be published between 00:00 GMT Tuesday, Août 9e, 2016, and 00:00 GMT Wednesday Août 10e, 2016.
  • Your post must contain the T-SQL Tuesday logo from above and the image should link back to this blog post.
  • Trackbacks should work. But, please do add a link to your post in the comments section below so everyone can see your work.
  • Tweet about your post using the hash tag #TSQL2sDay.

You Deserve to be an MVP

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: July 25, 2016

I have been sitting on this article for a while now. I have been tossing around some Microsoft_MVP_logo_thumb
thoughts and finally it is time to share some of those thoughts with the masses. I hope to provoke further thought on the topic of being an MVP.

I want to preface all of these thoughts first by saying that I believe there are many great people out there who are not an MVP who deserve to be an MVP. These are the types of people that do a lot for the community and strive to bring training and increased knowledge to more people in various platforms under the Microsoft banner.

Now for some obligatory information. While it is true I am an MVP, I feel obligated to remind people that I have zero (yup that is a big fat zero) influence over the MVP program. I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to retain the position of MVP along with all of the rest of the MVP community (there are a few of us out there). Not only am I grateful to the program for allowing me in, I am also grateful to all of those that nominated me.

Work – and lots of it!

mvp_banner

One of the first things that strikes me is the nomination process for the MVP program. There are two parts to the process. The easy part comes from the person making the nomination. That said, if you are nominating somebody or if you are asking somebody to nominate you, read this guide from Jen Stirrup. Jen has listed a bunch of work that has to be done on the part of nominator. Or is it work for the person making the nomination?

When you really start thinking about it, the nominee is really the person that needs to do a fair amount of work. Yes, it is a good amount of work to do. Then again, maybe it is not very much work for you at all.

One of the things that really bugs me about the process is all of this work. Not specifically that I get the opportunity to do it. No, more specifically that there seems to be a growing trend in the community of entitlement. I feel that far too many people, that do a lot within the community, feel they are entitled to being accepted into the MVP program. And of course there are others that do much less and also exhibit the same sentiment.

Entitled?

When you feel you deserve to be an MVP, are you prepared to do more work? I have heard from more than one source that they will not fill out all the extra information requested when they are nominated. The prevailing reason here being that they are entitled, because they do some bit of community work, to be automatically included. Another prevailing sentiment, around this extra work, is that Microsoft should already be tracking the individual and know everything there is to know about the contributions of said individual.

These sentiments couldn’t be further from the fact. If you are thinking along the lines of either of these sentiments, you are NOT an MVP. There are a ton of professionals in the world doing a lot of community activities who are just as deserving of becoming an MVP. It long_resumeis hardly plausible for Microsoft to track every candidate in the world. Why not tell them a bit about yourself?

RESUME / CV

When applying for a job, how do you go about applying for that job? Every job for which I have ever applied, I have needed to fill out an application as well as send a resume to the employer. I hardly think any employer would hire me without knowing that I am interested in the job.

That sounds fantastic for a job right? Being an MVP surely has no need to send a resume for that, is there? Well, technically no. However, if you treat your community work like you would treat any other experience you have, you may start to see the need for the resume just a touch more. When nominated, you are requested to provide a lot of information to Microsoft that essentially builds your resume to be reviewed for the MVP program.

One of the prevailing sentiments I have heard from more than one place is that filling out all of this information is just bragging on yourself. That sentiment is not too far from reality. Just like any resume, you have to highlight your experiences, your accomplishments and your skills. Without this kind of information, how could Microsoft possibly know anything about you? Do you have the paparazzi following you and sending the information along to Microsoft for you? If you do, then why even bother with the MVP program? Your popularity is probably on a bigger scale than the MVP program if you have your own paparazzi.

Invest in your Professional Self

resume_wordcloudThe more effort you put into your candidate details the better chance you have at standing out within the review process. Think about it this way, would you turn in a piece of paper with just your name on it for a job? Or…would you take hours to invest in your personal self and produce a good resume that will stand out in the sea of resumes that have been submitted?

If you ask me to submit you as an MVP and I do, I would hope that you complete your MVP resume (candidate profile) and submit it to Microsoft. If you don’t take the time to do that, then I would find it hard to ever submit you again. The refusal to fill out that information speaks volumes to me and says either you are not interested or think too much of yourself for the MVP program.

Leadership

One of the attributes of an MVP is that of leadership. A simple measure of leadership actually falls into the previous two sections we just covered. If you are contributing to the community, that would be one small form of leadership. If you are willing to follow, that is also a form of leadership. If you are able to complete your information and submit it, then that is also an attribute of leadership.

Leaders demonstrate their leadership by being able to take direction, teaching others (community work), completing tasks when necessary, and reporting back up to their superiors on successes and failures (the last two can be attached to the completion of the nomination data).

Don’t believe me about leadership being an attribute of an MVP? Take a gander at this snippet from my last renewal letter. Highlighted in red is the pertinent sentence.

MVPrenew15_leader

You can run the phrase through a translator or take my word for it that it pertains to exceptional leaders in the technical community.

It’s not a Job though

I am sure some of the pundits out there would be clamoring that if the MVP program were an actual job, then they would perform all of the extra work. I have two observations for this: 1) it speaks to the persons character and 2) MVP really is more like a job than you may think.

The MVP program is not a paid job and probably falls more into the realm of volunteering back2workthan a paid job. Despite that, if you treat it more like a job with full on responsibilities you will have greater success in getting accepted and you will have a greater sense of fulfillment. Additionally, you will get further along with more opportunities within the MVP program just like a traditional job.

Just like a traditional job, there are responsibilities, non-disclosures, internal communications, and annual reviews. Did any of those terms raise your eyebrow? The community contribution paperwork does not end with becoming an MVP – that is just the job application / resume. Every year, you have to provide an annual review. This review is a recap of the entire year with your personal accomplishments and is basically a self-review that would be provided to the manager. I am sure you are familiar with the process of providing a self-review to document reasons why you should remain employed or even get a raise.

Non-traditional Job

As with a regular job, you must continue to accomplish something in order to maintain the position. The accomplishments can come in any form of community contribution such as blogs, speaking, mentoring, or podcasts (as examples). What is not often realized is that this takes time. Sometimes, it takes a lot of time. When you consider the time as a part of your effort, I hope you start to realize that being an MVP really is a lot like a part time job (and a full time job in some cases).

When we start talking about being an MVP in quantity of hours contributed and tasks accomplished, it is not hard to see it as a job. So if it really is just like a job, how much time are you willing to invest in the documentation for this award? Is it at least comparable to the time you invest in documenting your professional career when applying for a paying job? If you don’t take that kind of pride or effort in documenting your worth to your personal career development, then I dare say you need to rethink your approach and re-evaluate whether you should be an MVP candidate.

Being an MVP is not just an award – it is a commitment to do more for the community!

The Virginia Tour 2016

db nsfwLong Time Coming

With less than a week before the Richmond SQLSaturday event, I am finally getting this post done – maybe.

This is not just a one day event for me. No no! I will be presenting for three consecutive days on many things SQL Server related. The Virginia Tour 2016 really is more of a Richmond Tour 2016 (March 16-19) with all three days being presentations in the Richmond area.

The tour starts off with a visit to the Richmond User Group. You can find details on the evening and event on their website – here.

Here is a quick recap of the NSFW (Naked Sql: Fundamentals to Wisdom) session:

Ever feel like there are just too many layers with SQL Server? You peel off a layer and behold there is yet another layer. SQL Server is rather complex. The complexities can be rather frustrating from time to time.

Join this NSFW (not safe for whining) session as we strip SQL down to the bare bones. I will help you undress the complexities of a few of the basic SQL Server concepts. These concepts will include locks, principals, query directives and deadlocks.

In this session I will disrobe misunderstandings related to the aforementioned topics. I will show the different types of principals in SQL Server. I will also show various scenarios involving locks and deadlocks along with some of their effects with and without query directives. The goal is to better understand these topics and to hopefully stop using and perpetuating common mis-uses of terminology and common misconceptions about the technology.

This should be a light-hearted and fun session with a bit of NSFW learning. Just hope the censors don’t get to the slide deck first!

After the user group presentation to kick off the week, there will be an all-day encore on Friday. Friday is officially a part of the SQLSaturday event. You are welcome to come and participate in my all day workshop – Monitoring SQL Server with Extended Events. There is an event page with details for registering that you can visit – here!

Here is some of what I will be covering in day 2 of this Richmond tour:

Every good enterprising DBA has the prime directive of monitoring the SQL Servers under his/her jurisdiction. The last thing a DBA wants to hear is that there is a problem with a database under his/her purview from an end-user.

SQL Server has progressed over time to give better and better information to the DBA.  Much of this information can be used in a home grown solution to monitor SQL Server. With the constant increase in surface area from Extended Events, the power to build a home grown solution becomes more and more feasible while being limited only by the imagination of the enterprising DBA (or developer or data professional). This full day workshop will introduce you to an Extended Events based solution to achieve that home-grown monitoring goal.

This full day session on Extended Events will help prepare you to put this tool to immediate use as you walk back to your daily duties.  This workshop will teach you about Extended Events starting with the basics and moving through how to create XE sessions that will get the right data for you, while doing so with minimal impact.

You will be exposed to advanced troubleshooting techniques as we work through complex issues that are made easier through the use of XE.  Take advantage of this opportunity to dive into the world of Extended Events and learn how you can make best use of this tool in your SQL 2008+ environment.

This will be a fun day if for nothing else than it is about Extended Events and how to glean great information from your SQL Servers. That and we will keep it light. Just remember, the more you are involved in the workshop the better it will be!

sqlsat486webAfter a brief break to grab some zzzz’s, I will be wrapping up this tour with the grand finale – SQL Saturday 486!!

Not only will I be presenting at this event, I have also volunteered.

I will have a short introductory style presentation about Extended Events. I intend to show a little profiler and a little Extended Events. As usual, I intend to keep the session light, fun and engaging. Here is a little more info on that session:

Extended Events were introduced in SQL Server 2008. With SQL 2014, we have seen a significant upgrade to this feature. Join me for a little adventure into the realm of extended events. We will discuss how to use extended events to aid in performance tuning and in day to day administration. We will also explore some background and the architecture of extended events. This is a fast paced session and will be a lot of fun. Attendees will be able to take back several sample XE sessions to help troubleshoot different issues and get to more intimately know their data/environment.

wheelofdoomThen to cap the day, I will be helping to assist with the Wheel of Doom.

The name of the session sounds much worse than it really is. The premise is simple. Speakers and attendees are invited to submit a lightening talk style session with slide deck. Then attendees of the session can volunteer to spin the wheel and present whichever session pops up.

This session is to help people get over the nerve of presenting. It will be very light-hearted and entertaining. No judgement, no shaming, just have fun with it!

 

 

Freecon – Oct 27 in Seattle

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Published on: September 23, 2015

Just over a week ago I announced that SQL Solutions Group was getting ready to host a day of training, FREECON if you will, in Seattle as a prelude to the PASS Summit of 2015. You can read all about that here, with registration being here.

While I really do hope to see the room fill with people looking to get some fantastic training, I also want to note that this training is not a part of the Summit. Though I hope it is viewed as an effort to enhance the learning made available during the week of Summit and to give the attendees more options.

An option is only really any good if some sort of detail can be attained about the option. While, I did publicize that the event was going to happen with a brief introduction into the the topics to be covered, one may be left wondering what really will be covered during the day.

Today, I hope to help make the SSG Freecon option a better option  by including a little detail into what it is that I will be presenting during my session on Extended Events.

Extended Events

This should come as a huge surprise given the 60 Days of XEvents series that I am currently publishing. While I am publishing a lot of information about Extended Events in this series, this Freecon session will cover the methodology that I, as a consultant, would use to troubleshoot various issues when a client seeks my help.

It is well known that there is a wealth of information within Extended Events. One can tap plenty of information about performance issues, errors, or general interest type stuff by setting up an XEvent Session and trapping some (hopefully) useful information.

roadmapDuring this session at the FreeCon, I want to help show how I would use Extended Events as a consultant to help find the pertinent information that will bring to light the problems the client is having.

How can I use Extended Events as a consultant to perform a health check on your server? That information will be covered throughout this session.

How can I determine where precisely the backup failed (and when) and be able to procure more information to determine if it was caused by some other event on the network? This is the type of information included in the methodology that I plan to share.

Think of this session as a condensed road-map to XE Success.

Free SQL Training in Seattle

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: September 15, 2015

The annual SQL Server Professional migration is about to begin. Many of us will be descending upon the city of Seattle for a week of training and networking at the PASS Summit. The week in Seattle will invariably begin and end on different days for many people. And since many will be coming to Seattle in advance of the first day of the actual Summit, there may be some idle time available.

free training

Well, because of this, SQL Solutions Group decided to provide yet another opportunity for those that may have a bit of free time on their hands. So, on Oct 27th, SSG is offering a day of free training (with a small fee for lunch) provided by four of our Microsoft Certified Masters.

If you are in the market for some extra training, you are invited to attend this day of training. Please register at our EventBrite listing to attend and see the training that we have on tap for you on Oct 27th, 2015.

Here is a brief overview of the training that will be given:

Code Smells for the Consultant

Throughout my career, I’ve seen developers do some pretty crazy things to databases ( I know because I come from a developer background). Come to this session to learn both what I (and SSG) look for and why it’s bad for the database (or your career), and alternatives that can be used. Some of the topics that I will discuss include; how coding mistakes open up the database for SQL Injection attacks, how coding choices can slow down the server, and how design choices keep SQL Server dumb ( if SQL Server was allowed to be smart, it would be faster!). Trust me, your DBA will love you for identifying and fixing these code smells.

A Masters Passport to Extended Events

As is commonly the case, all good things come to an end.  And now is as good a time as any for the use of SQL Trace and Profiler to come to an end.  Let’s face it, Trace was a good tool and had some wonderful uses.  Profiler for that matter was a good tool and was useful at times.

It is time to let those old tools retire gracefully and move into the world of XE.  This workshop will provide you the means to let Profiler and Trace be retired from your tool-set as you discover all that XE has to offer.

This focused session on Extended Events will help prepare you to put this tool to immediate use as you walk back to your daily duties.  This workshop will teach you about Extended Events starting with the basics and moving through to some specific XE sessions that I would use to troubleshoot in a client environment – while doing so with minimal impact.

You will be exposed to advanced troubleshooting techniques as we work through complex issues that are made easier through the use of XE.  Take advantage of this opportunity to dive into the world of Extended Events and learn how you can make best use of this tool in your SQL 2008+ environment.

Practical Powershell for the DBA

Think of all the tools you use in managing your SQL Servers. All those SQL Servers being managed by tools and man that is a lot of clicks. We will show practical scripts and techniques to help you get a handle on all those clicks. Whether you are gathering data or statistics from your SQL Servers or deploying an object to all of them. Configuration items are not excluded from the need for good tools. PowerShell is that tool that will let you get away from all those clicks. Reusable scripts that let you manage all those instances with ease. This session will give you a great start on how to think about admin tasks using PowerShell scripts or modules. Many items are already out there to help you and we will take a good look.

Transaction Isolation Levels, Locking and Deadlocking

Managing concurrency is one of the most challenging aspects of working with any enterprise DBMS. There is much confusion out there about locking, blocking, and deadlocks.

In this demo heavy session we will clear up the confusion by defining what each of these items are and what their causes are. We will then dig into each of SQL Server’s built in isolation levels and explore how they affect concurrency. Understanding concurrency and how isolation levels impact it is one of the most important things you need to know as a SQL Server developer. But understanding when to use each one can be daunting. Whether you are a developer who needs to understand how isolation works and why NOLOCK is not an appropriate hint in most cases, or a seasoned DBA who needs to understand the less commonly used isolation methods, this session is for you. We will look at each level, how it impacts the engine, and examine appropriate (and inappropriate) use cases for each.

 

TSQL Recipes – 2014 Edition

Announcing…the book

book_coverAt long last the wait is over. After much blood, sweat and more blood and sweat, the next edition of the SQL Server Recipes book is finished.

This edition brings several changes and quite a bit of re-write. It has been updated for many of the new SQL Server 2014 (well, new, at least until SQL 2016 hits mainstream) features that were added. In addition, we revisited some of the other features that had been omitted from previous editions to try and give it a more encompassing feel.

All of that said, the book is not a comprehensive listing of every command, jot or tittle in SQL Server. There were a finite number of pages and the features in SQL Server just has far too many features and nuances to cover within a single edition.

Despite the limitation of page quantity, we do feel that this is a pretty comprehensive book covering a wide array of features with several examples of how to perform various tasks along with use-cases for when to use the example.

When you crack the covers, you will find examples of how to perform backups to blob storage in Azure, create In-memory OLTP tables, restore from blob storage, and in some cases you will see how to use Extended Events to help with troubleshooting. That is just a small sampling of the contents that fill the almost 900 pages in this book.

Combine this reference book with the previous editions, and you will have an excellent resource for SQL Server.

You can purchase the book on Amazon – here.

Now for the mushy stuff

I am grateful to the folks at Apress for letting us come on board with this book and continue writing about SQL Server and creating a great resource.

I am grateful to the other authors Jonathan Gennick and Wayne Sheffield for helping push this along. The collaboration and support provided by these guys was fantastic. Their patience was also exceptional.

Equally important was the patience and understanding afforded by my family. Writing does take a significant amount of time and they sacrificed so I could continue on this project.

Thanks to all these folks for helping make this a great achievement!

Murder and XE Train in Louisville

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: July 17, 2015

I am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Amazing this thing is still going on after the sailing train comment that was made around the time of PASS Summit 2013.

lvillecrazytrain

 

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 403 in Louisville will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Louisville, KY. Did I mention that this is a:

bogo

That’s right! If you get two all day sessions for the price of one! Attend just one or both of the sessions that Wayne and I will be presenting. You can see full details at our eventbrite site here.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, these sessions are for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, these sessions are a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years of working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

That is just the Murder session. Here are the details for the XE session.

A Masters Passport to Extended Events

As is commonly the case, all good things come to an end.  And now is as good a time as any for the use of SQL Trace and Profiler to come to an end.  Let’s face it, Trace was a good tool and had some wonderful uses.  Profiler for that matter was a good tool and was useful at times.

It is time to let those old tools retire gracefully and move into the world of XE.  This full day workshop will provide you the means to let Profiler and Trace be retired from your toolset as you discover all that XE has to offer.

This full day session on Extended Events will help prepare you to put this tool to immediate use as you walk back to your daily duties.  This workshop will teach you about Extended Events starting with the basics and moving through how to create XE sessions that will get the right data for you, while doing so with minimal impact.

You will be exposed to advanced troubleshooting techniques as we work through complex issues that are made easier through the use of XE.  Take advantage of this opportunity to dive into the world of Extended Events and learn how you can make best use of this tool in your SQL 2008+ environment.

Course Objectives

  1. Build a knowledge base for Extended Events
  2. Become familiar with the tools for Extended Events
  3. Become familiar with uses for Extended Events
  4. Get acquainted with troubleshooting scenarios for Extended Events
  5. Begin to put Extended Events to practical use
  6. Return to work with enough information to eradicate Profiler from the environment

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles at www.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is also an MVP for SQL Server.

 

 

 

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Louisville SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 75 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $150 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Louisville for these workshops, I will also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on August 22, 2015 (the Saturday after the workshops which run Aug. 20-21, 2015).  You can view the available sessions here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

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