September 2014 Las Vegas UG Meeting

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Published on: September 10, 2014

Who is up for a little free learning this week? Besides the opulence and feast that was the 24 Hours of PASS (Summit Preview), we have more training in store for you from the people in Las Vegas. Let’s call this a preview for next week which happens to be DevConnections (which also happens to be in Vegas)!!

The Las Vegas User Group is happy to announce our monthly meeting.  The meeting is available for in person and webinar style.  The start time is 6:30 PM Pacific and the details are listed in this post.  We hope to see you there!

Capture

Abstract: PowerShell: The Way of the DBA Dragon

In this introduction to PowerShell, attendees will learn how to start from scratch with PowerShell 3.0 or newer, use the pipeline, run T-SQL against multiple instances, use transcripts, and be shown martial arts usage of one of the SQLPSX cmdlets.  Scripts will be provided.

BIO

Lars Rasmussen was born in Illinois, but considers Utah home.  He does not play video games, is learning to camp and hike, and is happy to have shared the summit of Mt. Timpanogos with two of his sons.  Lars’ wife and four children help him smile and laugh, and the family dog is teaching him patience.  Playing board games is one his favorite pastimes.  He considers SQL Server, PowerShell, and CMD.EXE some of his dearest frenemies.  Lars enjoys the company of SQL Server professionals and sysadmins – he used to be one of the latter, and is employed as a database administrator for HealthEquity.

LiveMeeting Info

Attendee URLhttps://www.livemeeting.com/cc/UserGroups/join?id=MR7C92&role=attend

Meeting ID: MR7C92

SQL Server UG in Vegas August 2014 Meeting

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Published on: August 13, 2014

evite

 

Another Great meeting and topic is coming to the folks in Las Vegas.  This month we have had the luck of finding Mike Fal (blog | twitter) step up and fill our speaker void.

Yes, it happens to be the second Thursday of the month already.  Being that time of month, the SQL Server UG of Las Vegas will be meeting at the Tahitti Village Resort and Spa to take in some great info on SQL Server and Powershell.

You can read the information about the meeting on our Meetup page here.  Or you can continue reading here.

Improving Database Restores with Powershell

Database restores are a key function of any database administrator’s job. However, it can be an extremely time consuming task to sort through your backups, find the right files, and then get your database up and running. In an emergency this will have a disastrous impact on your Recovery Time Objective(RTO) and lead to the dreaded angry-CTO-in-your-cube effect. By leveraging some easy-to-use Powershell scripts, you can avoid the second disaster and the pain that comes with it. By attending this session, you will understand how you can use the Powershell automation framework for database restores, see scripts that will let you restore faster, and learn techniques to extend these tools for migrating data and testing backups.

Michael Fal  

Mike Fal is a musician turned SQL Server DBA, with 10+ years of experience as a database administrator. He has worked for several different industries, including healthcare, software development, marketing, and manufacturing and has experience supporting databases from 1 GB to 4 TB in size. Mike received his a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1996 and has been caught playing trombone in public on more than one occasion.

LiveMeeting Info

Attendee URL:https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/UserGroups/join?id=4RD8NP&role=attend

Meeting ID: 4RD8NP

Whether you are in Vegas or you are somewhere else, you are welcome to join us.  We hope to see you Thursday evening.

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family and Community

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: August 12, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150Look at that, it is once again that time of the month that has come to be known as TSQL Tuesday.  TSQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party that occurs on the second Tuesday (most generally) of the month.  This event was the brainchild of Adam Machanic (Blog | Twitter).  

Anybody who desires to participate in this blog party is welcome to join.  Coincidentally, that open invitation is at the base of this months topic – Family and Community.  The invitation, issued by Jeffrey Verheul (blog | twitter), for this month said the following.

This month I would like to give everyone the opportunity to write about SQL Family. The first time I heard of SQL Family, was on Twitter where someone mentioned this. At first I didn’t know what to think about this. I wasn’t really active in the community, and I thought it was a little weird. They were just people you meet on the internet, and might meet in person at a conference some day. But I couldn’t be more wrong about that!

Once you start visiting events, forums, or any other involvement with the community, you’ll see I was totally wrong. I want to hear those stories. How do you feel about SQL Family? Did they help you, or did you help someone in the SQL Family? I would love to hear the stories of support, how it helped you grow and evolve, or how you would explain SQL Family to your friends and family (which I find hard). Just write about whatever topic you want, as long as it’s related to SQL Family or community.

What is it?

We have all likely seen SQL Family thrown about here and there.  But what exactly is this notion we hear about so often?

I think we have a good idea about what family might be.  I think we might even have a good idea of what a friend is.  Lastly, I might propose that we know what a community is.  When we talk of this thing called SQL Family, I like to think that it is a combination of family, friends and community.

mushroom

These are people that can come together and talk about various different things that span far beyond SQL Server.  We may only see each other at events every now and then.  Those events can be anything from a User Group meeting to a large conference or even at a road race (5k, half marathon, marathon).

These are the people that are willing to help where help is needed or wanted.  That help can be anything ranging from well wishes and prayers, to teaching about SQL Server, to lending a vehicle, or anything along that spectrum.

I have seen this community go out of their way to help provide a lift to a hotel or to the airport.  These people will help with lodging in various circumstances when/if they can.  These are the people that have been known to make visits to hospitals to give well wishes for other people in the community.

Isn’t that what friends / family really boils down to?  People that can talk to each other on an array of topics?  People that go out of their way to help?  Think about it for a minute or three.

Presenting at PSSUG

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Published on: August 4, 2014

pssug

 

Coming up this week, I have been given the opportunity to do something I enjoy doing.  I have been invited to present to the folks in Philadelphia.

Sebastian Meine (blog | twitter) approached me during SQL Saturday in Philadelphia and I was happy to help where I could.

The topic for this presentation will be Extended Events.  We are going to try a slightly different approach, but here is what was posted in the meeting invite.

Jason Brimhall SQL 2012 Extended Events
Extended Events were introduced in SQL Server 2008. With each edition since, we have seen a significant upgrade to this feature. Join me for a little adventure into defining this thing called Extended Events. We will discuss how to use Extended Events to aid in performance tuning and in day to day administration. We will also explore some background and the architecture of Extended Events.
Jason Brimhall

Jason Brimhall

 

As a Microsoft Certified Master/Microsoft Certified Solutions Master, I have 19 years’ experience in the technology industry, including more than 10 with SQL Server. I also earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Information Systems from Utah State University. One of the highlights of my career was co-authoring SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach .  I am a frequent presenter at SQL Server events worldwide, which includes SQLSaturdays and User Groups. I am also currently helping lead the Las Vegas SQL Users Group.

I am looking forward to this opportunity and to mingle with the group for a bit.  I hope to see you there.

Oh, and here is the link to the invite for the meeting.

Murder in Raleigh

sqlsat320_webI am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

raleigh_traini

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 320 in Raleigh will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Raleigh NC.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles atwww.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Raleigh SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 25 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $110 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Raleigh for this workshop, I hope to also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on Sep 6 2014 (the day after the workshop which is Sep 5, 2014).  I hope to update with the selected session(s) when that information becomes available.

You can see more details about the topics lined up for this event – here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

Top 10 Recommended Books…

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Published on: July 29, 2014

So the title says it all, right?  Well, only really partially.

Recently an article was published listing the top 10 most recommended books for SQL Server.  That’s the part the title doesn’t say.  It is really important to understand that we are talking about the top 10 recommended books for SQL Server.

The beauty of the top 10 list is that I have a book on that list.  It caught me by surprise.  That is very cool.

If you are interested in finding a book, I recommend naturally that you check out my book.  But just as importantly have a look at the list.  This was a list that was published independently by SQL Magazine.  On the list you will find books by people like Kalen Delaney, Itzik Ben-Gan, and Grant Fritchey.

2012_Recipes

Check out the original list, here!

Murder In Denver

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: July 14, 2014

sqlsat331_webI am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

train

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 331 in Denver will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day pre-con / workshop event.  The session is one of three all day sessions for the event in Denver CO.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles atwww.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Denver SQL site – here.  There are only 30 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $125 up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to choose Wayne’s class.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Denver for the Precon, I hope to also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on Sep 20 2014 (the day after the precon which is Sep 19, 2014).  I hope to update with the selected session(s) when that information becomes available.

You can see more details about the topics lined up for this event – here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some pre-con sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

The SQL Sac wrap!!

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 3 Comments
Published on: July 14, 2014

sqlsat312_web

Every SQL Saturday leaves a mark of some sort.  This time around, the folks in Sacramento have really helped leave a BIG mark.
That’s right, this last weekend was SQL Saturday in Sacramento Ca.  You might have seen my announcement about it here.

This event had a lot of Unique flair to it.  Besides having Jason Horner (blog | twitter) in attendance, the committee thought it wise to provide all of us with these little trinkets.

 

brand_inverted

 

That happens to be a branding iron.  I have inverted it in this picture for readability.  We received these speaker gifts at the speaker dinner the night before the event.  That is pretty normal.  What was different about this speaker dinner is that it was in a volunteers backyard and was a barbecue.  Yes!  There was fire!  Yes, we had implements of pain!  And yes, there were many jokes flung about during the evening.  If you were wondering, the first person to put his branding iron in the fire and to brand something was indeed Jason Horner.

Yes! This event left a BIG mark!

All the seriousness aside, there were some great presentations.  I was a bit disappointed to not be able to see the presentation about parameter sniffing by Benjamin Nevarez.  But I found my way into other presentations that made up for it.

If you haven’t already, congratulate the SQL SAC crew for their new youtube channel.  While you are at it, don’t forget to thank them for a great event.

For my first event traveling west, this was a memorable one.

July 2014 Vegas UG Meeting

Categories: News, Professional, SSSOLV
Tags: , ,
Comments: 3 Comments
Published on: July 9, 2014

Coming up this week is the Vegas UG meeting.  Keith Tate has been gracious enough to accept our speaker invitation and will be presenting.

The meeting will be held 10 July 2014 at 6:30 Pacific.  Location and time details can be found on our meetup page.

BIO

Keith Tate is a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server 2008 and a Senior Database Administrator with over 14 years of experience as a data professional. During Keith’s professional career he has been a developer, DBA and data architect. Keith is also active in the SQL Server community and is currently the chapter leader of the Albuquerque SQL Server User Group.

The Curious Case of Isolation Levels

Have you ever seen or used “WITH (NOLOCK)” in T-SQL? Do you know what it does and its side effects? Is SQL Server optimistic or pessimistic when it comes to locking? Can it be both? In this session we will cover these questions and discuss how and why SQL Server takes locks and how that affects other users. We will go over alternatives for using NOLOCK and discuss when it is appropriate to use. In addition, we will discuss what are the ACID properties and how to monitor locks and blocks.

LiveMeeting Info

Attendee URLhttps://www.livemeeting.com/cc/UserGroups/join?id=BSG34W&role=attend

Meeting ID: BSG34W

Is your Team Willing to Take Control?

TSQL2sDay150x150

The calendar tells us that once again we have reached the second tuesday of the month.  In the SQL Community, this means a little party as many of you may already know.  This is the TSQL Tuesday Party.

This month represents the 56th installment of this party.  This institution was implemented by Adam Machanic (b|t) and is hosted by Dev Nambi (b|t) this month.

The topic chosen for the month is all about the art of being able to assume.

In many circles, to assume something infers a negative connotation.  From time to time, it is less drastic when you might have a bit of evidence to support the assumption.  In this case, it would be closer to a presumption.  I will not be discussing either of those connotations.

What is this Art?

Before getting into this art that was mentioned, I want to share a little background story.

Let’s try to paint a picture of a common theme I have seen in environment after environment.  There are eight or nine different teams.  Among these teams you will find multiple teams to support different data environments.  These data environments could include a warehouse team, an Oracle team, and a SQL team.

As a member of the SQL team, you have the back-end databases that support the most critical application for your employer/client.  As a member of the SQL team, one of your responsibilities is to ingest data from the warehouse or from the Oracle environment.

Since this is a well oiled machine, you have standards defined for the ingestion, source data, and the destination.  Right here we could throw out a presumption (it is well founded) that the standards will be followed.

Another element to consider is the directive from management that the data being ingested is not to be altered by the SQL team to make the data conform to standards.  That responsibility lies squarely on the shoulder of the team providing the data.  Should bad data be provided, it should be sent back to the team providing it.

Following this mandate, you find that bad data is sent to the SQL team on a regular basis and you report it back to have the data, process, or both fixed.  The next time the data comes it appears clean.  Problem solved, right?  Then it happens again, and again, and yet again.

Now it is up to you.  Do you continue to just report that the data could not be imported yet again due to bad data?  Or do you now assume the responsibility and change your ingestion process to handle the most common data mistakes that you have seen?

I am in favor of assuming the responsibility.  Take the opportunity to make the ingestion process more robust.  Take the opportunity to add better error handling.  Take the opportunity continue to report back that there was bad data.  All of these things can be done in most cases to make the process more seamless and to have it perform better.

By assuming the responsibility to make the process more robust and to add better reporting/ logging to your process, you can only help the other teams to make their process better too.

While many may condemn assumptions, I say proceed with your assumptions.  Assume more responsibility.  Assume better processes by making them better yourself.  If it means rocking the boat, go ahead – these are good assumptions.

If you don’t, you are applying the wrong form of assumption.  By not assuming the responsibility, you are assuming that somebody else will or that the process is good enough.  That is bad in the long run.  That would be the only burning “elephant in the room”.

elephants

From here, it is up to you.  How are you going to assume in your environment?

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