TSQL Recipes – 2014 Edition

Announcing…the book

book_coverAt long last the wait is over. After much blood, sweat and more blood and sweat, the next edition of the SQL Server Recipes book is finished.

This edition brings several changes and quite a bit of re-write. It has been updated for many of the new SQL Server 2014 (well, new, at least until SQL 2016 hits mainstream) features that were added. In addition, we revisited some of the other features that had been omitted from previous editions to try and give it a more encompassing feel.

All of that said, the book is not a comprehensive listing of every command, jot or tittle in SQL Server. There were a finite number of pages and the features in SQL Server just has far too many features and nuances to cover within a single edition.

Despite the limitation of page quantity, we do feel that this is a pretty comprehensive book covering a wide array of features with several examples of how to perform various tasks along with use-cases for when to use the example.

When you crack the covers, you will find examples of how to perform backups to blob storage in Azure, create In-memory OLTP tables, restore from blob storage, and in some cases you will see how to use Extended Events to help with troubleshooting. That is just a small sampling of the contents that fill the almost 900 pages in this book.

Combine this reference book with the previous editions, and you will have an excellent resource for SQL Server.

You can purchase the book on Amazon – here.

Now for the mushy stuff

I am grateful to the folks at Apress for letting us come on board with this book and continue writing about SQL Server and creating a great resource.

I am grateful to the other authors Jonathan Gennick and Wayne Sheffield for helping push this along. The collaboration and support provided by these guys was fantastic. Their patience was also exceptional.

Equally important was the patience and understanding afforded by my family. Writing does take a significant amount of time and they sacrificed so I could continue on this project.

Thanks to all these folks for helping make this a great achievement!

Murder and XE Train in Louisville

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: July 17, 2015

I am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Amazing this thing is still going on after the sailing train comment that was made around the time of PASS Summit 2013.

lvillecrazytrain

 

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 403 in Louisville will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Louisville, KY. Did I mention that this is a:

bogo

That’s right! If you get two all day sessions for the price of one! Attend just one or both of the sessions that Wayne and I will be presenting. You can see full details at our eventbrite site here.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, these sessions are for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, these sessions are a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years of working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

That is just the Murder session. Here are the details for the XE session.

A Masters Passport to Extended Events

As is commonly the case, all good things come to an end.  And now is as good a time as any for the use of SQL Trace and Profiler to come to an end.  Let’s face it, Trace was a good tool and had some wonderful uses.  Profiler for that matter was a good tool and was useful at times.

It is time to let those old tools retire gracefully and move into the world of XE.  This full day workshop will provide you the means to let Profiler and Trace be retired from your toolset as you discover all that XE has to offer.

This full day session on Extended Events will help prepare you to put this tool to immediate use as you walk back to your daily duties.  This workshop will teach you about Extended Events starting with the basics and moving through how to create XE sessions that will get the right data for you, while doing so with minimal impact.

You will be exposed to advanced troubleshooting techniques as we work through complex issues that are made easier through the use of XE.  Take advantage of this opportunity to dive into the world of Extended Events and learn how you can make best use of this tool in your SQL 2008+ environment.

Course Objectives

  1. Build a knowledge base for Extended Events
  2. Become familiar with the tools for Extended Events
  3. Become familiar with uses for Extended Events
  4. Get acquainted with troubleshooting scenarios for Extended Events
  5. Begin to put Extended Events to practical use
  6. Return to work with enough information to eradicate Profiler from the environment

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles at www.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is also an MVP for SQL Server.

 

 

 

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Louisville SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 75 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $150 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Louisville for these workshops, I will also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on August 22, 2015 (the Saturday after the workshops which run Aug. 20-21, 2015).  You can view the available sessions here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

PASS Summit 2015 – Guess What?

Comments: No Comments
Published on: July 13, 2015

Quick run the other way!

PASS Summit will never be the same!

Why?

Well, because for the first time in the history of me, I have been selected to speak at such a prestigious event.

I'm Speaking Graphic_Large

Isn’t that just crazy?

In some ways it seems crazy. When I received the email I was exhilarated and completely astonished. I had hoped I would be selected, but did not entirely think it would happen this year.

I have to confess that I am honored to be one of the many to have been selected. This is really cool. You may be wondering why I am blogging about this opportunity soooo late after the speakers were announced. Well, the answer is rather straight forward. Life has been a bit crazy the past few weeks.

The last night of SQL Cruise I received a phone call from my family letting me know that my grandfather had become fatally ill. I spent the next several days with him in the hospital until he passed away a week later. Then there were the holidays and the funeral. And to cap that off, I flew down to Phoenix to speak to the two user groups last week. SO, it has been a whirlwind!

All of that said, I am announcing it now and really am excited to be a apart of such an AWESOME event.

Now for the surprise.

When I discovered which session had been selected, I was very surprised. I expected one of my Extended Events sessions to be picked. Nope! Instead, one of my other fun sessions was picked. We will be talking about Compression in SQL Server at Summit.

I am hopeful we are able to make this an exciting and enjoyable session for the attendees. I hope the attendees will also be able to take the information home and be able to use it for better (or worse) in their environments.

I do hope to see many of you in attendance. On the agenda for the attendees in this session will be:

  1. Dive into functions available to help learn about compression
  2. Evaluation of compression settings and possible savings
  3. Dive into the Pages
  4. A quick look at the CD and compressed data types
  5. Levity

Of course, I could just decide to change this on a whim – buahaha!

SQL Cruise Mediterranean+

Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: June 24, 2015

This is a post that is looooong overdue. I have intended to write some of this at least since the first SQL Cruise I attended back in 2013 (in the Caribbean). Now with three Cruises under the belt and plenty of awesome experiences, it is high time to follow through on those intentions.

Official_SQLCruise_2015For those that have not heard, SQL Cruise is a mix of training and vacation. You get a little (or a lot) of SQL and then you get a little (or a lot) of vacation mixed with the opportunity to see places you may not have otherwise visited. Last but certainly not least is the opportunity afforded to all attendees to meet other people they may have never otherwise gotten a chance to meet. This last benefit may be the most important facet of SQL Cruise in that the networking done during the cruise will last a long time and can certainly open a few doors if/when necessary.

One great example of this networking occurred on the first cruise I attended. In the meetings outside of the scheduled training, one of the other cruisers (he is now an MCM and MVP) asked a pretty important question about an issue within his work environment. A performance monitoring package they ran for all of their clients was causing some serious problems. The problems affected about 30% of all of the servers which numbered over 1500. The application on the affected servers would stop responding and they would no longer receive metrics or alerts to conditions being raised.

This problem was significant enough that they engaged Microsoft and Microsoft engineers had been collecting metrics and logs for over six months (at the time). There was a series of try this and try that and all of it resulted in no change whatsoever. So this fellow cruiser brought the issue to the cruise with him. In chatting with the cruiser (oh, and he had to fly to the US from Europe in order to attend), I discovered that the symptoms he was enduring were quite similar to some things I had seen within SSIS packages for example. We discussed a quick fix which he took back to his employer.

Through a series of tests and deployments, this Cruiser and his employer rolled out the fix to all of the servers in the environment. This fix ended up saving them so much money in labor and other costs, that his employer sent him and his family (eight people in total) back to SQL Cruise in the Caribbean the following year. The ROI for this Cruiser and his employer was huge! Additionally, he and I have become friends thanks to the Cruise. This is the sort of stuff that defines SQL Cruise.

This year, we had the chance to repeat the Cruise by attending the Mediterranean version. This installment was a whirlwind of touring Europe. Some started in London before proceeding to Barcelona and then on to such places as Pompeii, Rome, Pisa, Cannes, Monaco, and Mallorica before returning to Barcelona to continue on to Berlin or London before returning home. For me, we chose to start in Paris and then taking the bullet train on to Barcelona.

Med Sunset

The tourism was fast and furious. The training was faster and more furious. And in the end, the European / Mediterranean trip was gone before we knew it. All who attended surely walked away with great memories and with having learned something (whether it be cultural, historic, or SQL in nature).

If you have the chance to attend a SQL Cruise, I would say do it. The training comes from the technical leads as well as the attendees in the rooms. Often, the tech lead will even defer to any of the other professionals in attendance. Especially in the case of Trace Flags as we learned this past week – in every session and in every office hours meeting. Just ask Grant Fritchey (blog | twitter) about it some time – he loves talking about Trace Flags.

Security as a Fleeting Thought

Comments: 6 Comments
Published on: February 10, 2015

Today we have another installment in what is known as TSQL Tuesday.  This month we have an invitation and topic given to us by the infamous Kenneth Fisher ( blog | twitter).

TSQL2sDay150x150Today, the invitation is for us to share our stories on how we like to manage security.  Or at least that is the request that was made by Kenneth.  I am going to take a bit of a twist on that request.  Instead of sharing how I like to manage security, I am going to share some interesting stories on how I have seen security managed.

Let’s just call this a short series on various case studies in how to manage your security in a very peculiar way.  Or as the blog title suggests, how to manage your security as an afterthought.

Case Study #1

dbsecurityWe have all dealt with the vendor that insists on the user account that will be used for their database and application be one of two things.  Either it needs to be sa or needs to be a member of the sysadmin fixed server role.  The ensuing discussion with those vendors is always a gem.  They insist the application will break, you as the diligent DBA prove otherwise, and then the senior manager sponsoring the application comes around with a mandate that you must provide the access the vendor is requesting.

Those are particularly fun times.  Sometimes, there is a mutual agreement in the middle on what security can be used and sometimes the DBA just loses.

But what about when it is not a vendor application that mandates such relaxed security for their application and database?  What if it happens to be the development group?  What if it happens to be a developer driven shop and you are the consultant coming in to help get things in order?

I have had the distinct pleasure of working in all of those scenarios.  My favorite was a client that hosted ~700 clients, each with their own database.  There were several thousand connections coming into the server and every single connection was coming in as ‘sa’.  Yes, that is correct.  There were no user logins other than the domain admins group on the server – which was also added to the sysadmin security role.  That is always a fun discussion to start and finish.  The look of color disappearing from the clients’ eyes as the realize the severity of the problem.

Please do not attempt this stunt at home.

Case Study #2

In a similar vain, another one that I have seen far too often is the desire to grant users dbo access within a database.  While this is less heinous than granting everybody sysadmin access – it is only a tad better.  Think about it in this way – does Joe from financing really need to be able to create and drop tables within the accounting database?  Does Marie from human resources need to be able to create or drop stored procedures from the HR database?  The answer to both should be ‘NO’.

In another environment, I was given the opportunity to perform a security audit.  Upon looking over things, it became very clear what the security was.  Somebody felt it necessary to add [Domain Users] to the dbo role on every database.  Yes, you read that correctly.  In addition to that, the same [Domain Users] group was added to the sysadmin server fixed security role.  HOLY COW!

In this particular case, they were constantly trying to figure out why permissions and objects were changing for all sorts of things within the database environment.  The answer was easy.  The fix is also easy – but not terribly easy to accept.

Please do not attempt this stunt at home.

Case Study #3

I have encountered vendor after vendor that has always insisted that they MUST have local admin and sysadmin rights on the box and instance (respectively).  For many this is a grey area because of the contracts derived between the client and the vendor.

For me, I have to ask why they need that level of access.  Does the vendor really need to be able to backup your databases and investigate system performance on your server?  Does that vendor need, or are they even engaged, to troubleshoot your system as a whole?  Or, do they just randomly sign in and apply application updates without your knowledge or perform other “routine” tasks unknown to you?

I have seen vendors change permissions and add back door accounts far too often.  They seldom if ever are capable of providing the level of support necessary when you are stuck with deadlocks by the second or blocking chains that tie up the entire server.  In addition, they are generally unavailable for immediate support when a production halting issue arises in their application – or at least not for a few hours.

This is specifically in regards to application vendors.  They are not your sysadmin and they are not your DBA.  If they must have RDP access or access to the database – put it under tight control.  Disable the account until they request access.  Then a request can be made and a note documented about why the access is needed.  Then the account can be enabled, monitored and disabled after a specified amount of time.

Please do not attempt this stunt at home.

This also changes when that vendor happens to be providing you IT functionality and is not specifically tied to an application.  Those relationships are a bit different and do require a little more trust to the person who is acting on your behalf as your IT staff.

Conclusion

I have shared three very dangerous stunts that are sometimes portrayed to be done by professionals.  Do not try this in your environment or at home.  It is dangerous to treat security with so little concern.  Security is not some stunt, and should be treated with a little more care and attention.

If you find yourself in any of these situations, an audit is your friend.  Create some audit process within SQL Server or on the Local server to track changes and accesses.  Find out what is going on and be prepared to act while you build your case and a plan for implementing tighter security.

Las Vegas UG This week

Comments: No Comments
Published on: January 5, 2015

What a fun week we have tuned up for the folks in Las Vegas.  It is the first full week of January and there is this huge convention going on near the strip.  And as timing would have it, this week is also the perfect time to have our User Group meeting.

What major conference is going on this week you ask?  Why it is time for 200,000 people to invade the strip, all of the major convention centers (well nearly all of them), and every last hotel room (as seen by the tripling in price for hotel rooms starting Tuesday Night – unless you go to the Cosmo where the room rate increased 20x this week).  That conference happens to be CES (Consumer Electronics Show).

If you happen to be in town for CES, live here in Vegas or are just in town this week, we invite you to come join us at the Las Vegas UG meeting on Thursday.

January SQL Invite

We have the full details for the meeting on our meetup site.  This month we have an interactive session where Wayne Sheffield will walk you through some nifty tips and tricks for Management Studio.  Read the full details on the meetup site and come visit us in person or via our livemeeting.  We’d love to see you.

Update:

We are swapping presenters this month at the chance to have a presenter in person.  Randy Knight will be in the area and has asked to be able to present.  Thanks to Wayne for being understanding.  Please check the meetup site for more details.

T-SQL Tuesday 61: A Season of Giving

Comments: No Comments
Published on: December 9, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150Tis the season for TSQL Tuesday.  Not only is it that season again, but it is also the Holiday season.

During this season, many people start to think about all of the things for which they are thankful.  Many may start to think about their families and friends.  And many others will focus more of their attention to neighbors and other people in the community.  This is often done regardless of how well you may know the people or in spite of ill feelings that may exist for the people at other times of the year.

Yes, it is a good time of the year.  And to top it off, we may even get to enjoy snow during this time of year while we sip hot cocoa, learn SQL and eat pies of many different sorts.  Yes! It is a glorious time of the year.

I already have a couple of SQL books to read as I cozy up close to the fire with my children near.  (Oh yes, it is never too early to learn SQL.)  A little SQL roasting on the open fire so to speak.  Awesome time of year.

With all that is going well and all the SQL I can be learning, it is also a Season of Giving.  It is because of the time of year that Wayne Sheffield was probably prompted to invite all of us to write about that topic for this months TSQL Tuesday.  You can read the invite here.

But thinking about that topic and the time of year, I wanted to talk briefly about some ways I know the SQL Community gives back.

Doctors without Borders

A really well known opportunity this past year that helped people to give back to the community was hosted by Argenis Fernandez (twitter) and Kirsten Benzel (twitterhere.  The two of them had this fantastic idea to involve the SQL Family in driving a fundraiser for Doctors without Borders.  They had publicized various goals to make it fun and achieved a lot of those goals.  This was an event I would like to see again and it was one that accomplished a lot of good.

Christmas Jars

Christmas JarEach Christmas season there is a phenomenon associated to a book called Christmas Jars.  People from all across the country anonymously donate a jar to somebody in the community that may have hit a stretch of hard luck.  In the jar is a variable amount of money for the family to use to help with whatever they need during that time.  You can read more about that here and here.

The Christmas Jars is something that my children do each year.  They find a family somewhere in town and find a way to get the jar to the family anonymously.  The amount of money is never the same, but the intent and love is always the same.  They are doing it to help their neighbors without any publicity.  They know the good that is brought from the love they show to their neighbors.

Watching my children participate in a worthwhile way to give makes me happy.  I hope it is something that will stick with them throughout their lives.

Community

All of that said, the TSQL Tuesday invite asked for what we plan to do in the upcoming year for the SQL community.  This is a really hard topic to answer.  It kind of depends on what opportunities become available in the upcoming year.  I can say this though, I do plan to continue to help and give where I can.

SQLSat in DC – it’s a wrap

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: December 8, 2014

sqlsatdc14
This past weekend I had the opportunity to go visit Washington DC.  It was just the second time I got to stay in the Nation’s capitol for more than just a few hours.  The previous opportunity came with last years event which I talked about here.  Sadly, my time was far too limited this trip and seeing the sites was far more limited.  Thus, I only saw them from the car or plane window in passing.  But that is far better than seeing them in photos or not at all.

The reason for the visit?  It was SQL Saturday 347.  Now, it is my chance to recap the event and what I learned.

sqlsat347_web

This year I really wanted to attend to see some of my friends and to help some friends as well.  An example is that one friend was looking for some good constructive feedback to his presentation.  That friend happens to be a person I met at the event from last year: Ayman El-Ghazali (blog).  I had a good conversation with Ayman in the speaker room following his session and between some of the sessions.  Ayman is a DBA that is working hard to learn and improve any way he can.  Those are traits that are important to have as a DBA these days.

Much like last year (and I even made the comment), it was warm again (definitely shorts weather) and it also rained again.  I really think there must be a trend with SQL Saturday in DC in that it brings rain.  There may be something there.

The event was well organized.  I think that is mostly due to Gigi Bell (twitter).  She is the wife of Chris Bell (twitter) and she whipped those boys into shape. 😉

There were some things that couldn’t be controlled necessarily.  But everybody came together and helped to make it work.

I had the great opportunity this year to present the very very very short session on Murder that I give as a precon along with Wayne Sheffield.  People walked away from the session expressing gratitude for the content and how much they learned.  Many were even curious to learn more of what we could present in the all day version.  Very COOL!

I also had a great time seeing SQLFamily.  Talking with friends and enjoying everybody’s company.  I did make it to a few sessions outside of mine.  And I got to chat with attendees while trying to answer their questions in the halls.

I am looking forward to this event again next year.  And I hope everybody that attended my sessions learned at least one thing.

One last thing.  Thanks to all of the attendees.  To say “the attendees were great,” at this event, would be a gross mis-understatement in my opinion.  The attendees were awake and engaged (even if they had never heard of “Clue” before the session).  They invested their time and effort and I think they helped to make the event top notch.

Murder in Charleston

I am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

Charleston Friend

 

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 354 in South Carolina will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Charleston, SC.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles at www.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant, SQL Server MVP and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Charleston SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 75 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $110 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Charleston for this workshop, we will also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on December 13, 2014 (the day after the workshop which is December 12, 2014).  You can view the available sessions here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

TSQL Tuesday #60: Something Learned This Way Comes

Comments: 5 Comments
Published on: November 11, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150It is once again time to come together as a community and talk about a common theme.  This monthly gathering of the community has just reached it’s 5th anniversary.  Yes, that’s right.  We have been doing this for 60 months or five years at this point.  That is pretty cool.

This month Chris Yates (blog | twitter) has taken the helm to lead us in our venture to discuss all the wonderful things that we have learned.  Well, maybe not all the things we have learned, but at least to discuss something we have learned.

Here are some details from the actual invite that you can read here.

Why do we come to events, webinars, sessions, networking? The basic fundamental therein is to learn; community. With that said here is this month’s theme. You have to discuss one thing, few things, or many things on something new you’ve learned recently. It could be from a webinar, event, conference, or colleague. The idea is for seasoned vets to new beginners to name at least one thing; in doing so it might just help one of your fellow SQL friends within the community.

The topic is straight forward but can be a bit difficult at times.  This is a pretty good topic to try and discuss.  I know I have been struggling for content for the topic.  Which makes it that much better because it provides a prime example of how to think about and discuss some pretty important things, while trying to compile that into a recap of one’s personal progress.

Let’s think about the topic for a bit and the timing of the topic.  This comes to us right on the heels of PASS Summit 2014 and in the middle of SQL Intersections in Las Vegas.  We might as well throw in there all of the other things like SQL Saturdays that have been happening leading up to and following those major conferences.

There has been ample opportunity over the past few weeks to learn technical content.  When networking with people there are ample opportunities at these major conferences to also learn about other people and about one’s self.  A good example of that can be seen in a blog post I wrote while attending PASS Summit, which you can read here.

The biggest learning opportunity that evolved from PASS Summit 2014 for me was the constant prodding in various sessions to break out the debugger and become more familiar with what is happening in various cases.  I saw the debugger used in three of the sessions I attended.  There are some great opportunities to learn more about SQL Server by taking some trinket of information from a session and trying to put it to use in your development environment.  This is where learning becomes internalized and gives a deeper understanding.

I hope you have been able to pick up on some tidbit that can be used to your advantage to get a deeper understanding of SQL Server.

«page 1 of 11






Calendar
August 2015
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  
Content
SQLHelp

SQLHelp


Welcome , today is Saturday, August 29, 2015