Murder in Charleston

I am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

Charleston Friend

 

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 354 in South Carolina will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Charleston, SC.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles at www.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant, SQL Server MVP and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Charleston SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 75 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $110 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Charleston for this workshop, we will also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on December 13, 2014 (the day after the workshop which is December 12, 2014).  You can view the available sessions here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

TSQL Tuesday #60: Something Learned This Way Comes

Comments: 4 Comments
Published on: November 11, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150It is once again time to come together as a community and talk about a common theme.  This monthly gathering of the community has just reached it’s 5th anniversary.  Yes, that’s right.  We have been doing this for 60 months or five years at this point.  That is pretty cool.

This month Chris Yates (blog | twitter) has taken the helm to lead us in our venture to discuss all the wonderful things that we have learned.  Well, maybe not all the things we have learned, but at least to discuss something we have learned.

Here are some details from the actual invite that you can read here.

Why do we come to events, webinars, sessions, networking? The basic fundamental therein is to learn; community. With that said here is this month’s theme. You have to discuss one thing, few things, or many things on something new you’ve learned recently. It could be from a webinar, event, conference, or colleague. The idea is for seasoned vets to new beginners to name at least one thing; in doing so it might just help one of your fellow SQL friends within the community.

The topic is straight forward but can be a bit difficult at times.  This is a pretty good topic to try and discuss.  I know I have been struggling for content for the topic.  Which makes it that much better because it provides a prime example of how to think about and discuss some pretty important things, while trying to compile that into a recap of one’s personal progress.

Let’s think about the topic for a bit and the timing of the topic.  This comes to us right on the heels of PASS Summit 2014 and in the middle of SQL Intersections in Las Vegas.  We might as well throw in there all of the other things like SQL Saturdays that have been happening leading up to and following those major conferences.

There has been ample opportunity over the past few weeks to learn technical content.  When networking with people there are ample opportunities at these major conferences to also learn about other people and about one’s self.  A good example of that can be seen in a blog post I wrote while attending PASS Summit, which you can read here.

The biggest learning opportunity that evolved from PASS Summit 2014 for me was the constant prodding in various sessions to break out the debugger and become more familiar with what is happening in various cases.  I saw the debugger used in three of the sessions I attended.  There are some great opportunities to learn more about SQL Server by taking some trinket of information from a session and trying to put it to use in your development environment.  This is where learning becomes internalized and gives a deeper understanding.

I hope you have been able to pick up on some tidbit that can be used to your advantage to get a deeper understanding of SQL Server.

Murder In Utah

I am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

goldspike

 

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 349 in Utah will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Lehi, UT (just south of Salt Lake City).

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles at www.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Salt Lake City SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 75 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $150 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Utah for this workshop, I will also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on October 25, 2014 (the day after the workshop which is Oct. 24, 2014).  You can view the available sessions here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family and Community

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: August 12, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150Look at that, it is once again that time of the month that has come to be known as TSQL Tuesday.  TSQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party that occurs on the second Tuesday (most generally) of the month.  This event was the brainchild of Adam Machanic (Blog | Twitter).  

Anybody who desires to participate in this blog party is welcome to join.  Coincidentally, that open invitation is at the base of this months topic – Family and Community.  The invitation, issued by Jeffrey Verheul (blog | twitter), for this month said the following.

This month I would like to give everyone the opportunity to write about SQL Family. The first time I heard of SQL Family, was on Twitter where someone mentioned this. At first I didn’t know what to think about this. I wasn’t really active in the community, and I thought it was a little weird. They were just people you meet on the internet, and might meet in person at a conference some day. But I couldn’t be more wrong about that!

Once you start visiting events, forums, or any other involvement with the community, you’ll see I was totally wrong. I want to hear those stories. How do you feel about SQL Family? Did they help you, or did you help someone in the SQL Family? I would love to hear the stories of support, how it helped you grow and evolve, or how you would explain SQL Family to your friends and family (which I find hard). Just write about whatever topic you want, as long as it’s related to SQL Family or community.

What is it?

We have all likely seen SQL Family thrown about here and there.  But what exactly is this notion we hear about so often?

I think we have a good idea about what family might be.  I think we might even have a good idea of what a friend is.  Lastly, I might propose that we know what a community is.  When we talk of this thing called SQL Family, I like to think that it is a combination of family, friends and community.

mushroom

These are people that can come together and talk about various different things that span far beyond SQL Server.  We may only see each other at events every now and then.  Those events can be anything from a User Group meeting to a large conference or even at a road race (5k, half marathon, marathon).

These are the people that are willing to help where help is needed or wanted.  That help can be anything ranging from well wishes and prayers, to teaching about SQL Server, to lending a vehicle, or anything along that spectrum.

I have seen this community go out of their way to help provide a lift to a hotel or to the airport.  These people will help with lodging in various circumstances when/if they can.  These are the people that have been known to make visits to hospitals to give well wishes for other people in the community.

Isn’t that what friends / family really boils down to?  People that can talk to each other on an array of topics?  People that go out of their way to help?  Think about it for a minute or three.

Murder in Raleigh

sqlsat320_webI am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

raleigh_traini

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 320 in Raleigh will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day workshop event.  The session is one of two all day sessions for the event in Raleigh NC.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles atwww.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Raleigh SQL Saturday site – here.  There are only 25 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $110 (plus fees) up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to tell your coworkers and friends.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Raleigh for this workshop, I hope to also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on Sep 6 2014 (the day after the workshop which is Sep 5, 2014).  I hope to update with the selected session(s) when that information becomes available.

You can see more details about the topics lined up for this event – here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some workshop sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

Top 10 Recommended Books…

Comments: No Comments
Published on: July 29, 2014

So the title says it all, right?  Well, only really partially.

Recently an article was published listing the top 10 most recommended books for SQL Server.  That’s the part the title doesn’t say.  It is really important to understand that we are talking about the top 10 recommended books for SQL Server.

The beauty of the top 10 list is that I have a book on that list.  It caught me by surprise.  That is very cool.

If you are interested in finding a book, I recommend naturally that you check out my book.  But just as importantly have a look at the list.  This was a list that was published independently by SQL Magazine.  On the list you will find books by people like Kalen Delaney, Itzik Ben-Gan, and Grant Fritchey.

2012_Recipes

Check out the original list, here!

Murder In Denver

Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: July 14, 2014

sqlsat331_webI am about to set sail on a new venture with my next official whistle stop.  This year has been plenty full of whistle stops and I plan on continuing.  You can read (in full) about previous whistle stops and why they are called whistle stops here.

Suffice it to say at this point that it all started with a comment about a sailing train a few months back.

train

Time to sink or sail, so to speak.  SQL Saturday 331 in Denver will mark the next attempt at what I hope to be a repeat performance – many times.  I will be tag-teaming with Wayne Sheffield in this all day pre-con / workshop event.  The session is one of three all day sessions for the event in Denver CO.

If you are a DBA or a database developer, this session is for you.  If you are managing a database and are experiencing performance issues, this session is a must.  We will chat with attendees about a horde of performance killers and other critical issues we have seen in our years working with SQL Server.  In short, some of these issues are pure murder on your database, DBA, developer and team in general.  We will work through many of these things and show some methods to achieve a higher state of database Zen.

Description

Join Microsoft Certified Masters, Wayne Sheffield and Jason Brimhall, as they examine numerous crazy implementations they have seen over the years, and how these implementations can be murder on SQL Server.  No topic is off limits as they cover the effects of these crazy implementations from performance to security, and how the “Default Blame Acceptors” (DBAs) can use alternatives to keep the developers, DBAs, bosses and even the end-users happy.

Presented by:

wayneWayne Sheffield, a Microsoft Certified Master in SQL Server, started working with xBase databases in the late 80’s. With over 20 years in IT, he has worked with SQL Server (since 6.5 in the late 90’s) in various dev/admin roles, with an emphasis in performance tuning. He is the author of several articles atwww.sqlservercentral.com, a co-author of SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Recipes, and enjoys sharing his knowledge by presenting at SQL PASS events and blogging at http://blog.waynesheffield.com/wayne

 

 

 

JasonBrimhall

Jason Brimhall has 10+ yrs experience and has worked with SQL Server from 6.5 through SQL 2012. He has experience in performance tuning, high transaction environments, as well as large environments.  Jason also has 18 years experience in IT working with the hardware, OS, network and even the plunger (ask him sometime about that). He is currently a Consultant and a Microsoft Certified Master(MCM). Jason is the VP of the Las Vegas User Group (SSSOLV).

 

 

 

 

Course Objectives

  1. Recognize practices that are performance pitfalls
  2. Learn how to Remedy the performance pitfalls
  3. Recognize practices that are security pitfalls
  4. Learn how to Remedy the security pitfalls
  5. Demos Demos Demos – scripts to demonstrate pitfalls and their remedies will be provided
  6. Have fun and discuss
  7. We might blow up a database

kaboom

 

There will be a nice mix of real world examples and some painfully contrived examples. All will have a good and useful point.

If you will be in the area, and you are looking for high quality content with a good mix of enjoyment, come and join us.  You can find registration information and event details at the Denver SQL site – here.  There are only 30 seats available for this murder mystery theater.  Reserve yours now.

The cost for the class is $125 up through the day of the event.  When you register, be sure to choose Wayne’s class.

Wait, there’s more…

Not only will I be in Denver for the Precon, I hope to also be presenting as a part of the SQLSaturday event on Sep 20 2014 (the day after the precon which is Sep 19, 2014).  I hope to update with the selected session(s) when that information becomes available.

You can see more details about the topics lined up for this event – here.

Shameless plug time

I present regularly at SQL Saturdays.  Wayne also presents regularly at SQL Saturdays.  If you are organizing an event and would like to fill some pre-con sessions, please contact either Wayne, myself or both of us for this session.

Is your Team Willing to Take Control?

TSQL2sDay150x150

The calendar tells us that once again we have reached the second tuesday of the month.  In the SQL Community, this means a little party as many of you may already know.  This is the TSQL Tuesday Party.

This month represents the 56th installment of this party.  This institution was implemented by Adam Machanic (b|t) and is hosted by Dev Nambi (b|t) this month.

The topic chosen for the month is all about the art of being able to assume.

In many circles, to assume something infers a negative connotation.  From time to time, it is less drastic when you might have a bit of evidence to support the assumption.  In this case, it would be closer to a presumption.  I will not be discussing either of those connotations.

What is this Art?

Before getting into this art that was mentioned, I want to share a little background story.

Let’s try to paint a picture of a common theme I have seen in environment after environment.  There are eight or nine different teams.  Among these teams you will find multiple teams to support different data environments.  These data environments could include a warehouse team, an Oracle team, and a SQL team.

As a member of the SQL team, you have the back-end databases that support the most critical application for your employer/client.  As a member of the SQL team, one of your responsibilities is to ingest data from the warehouse or from the Oracle environment.

Since this is a well oiled machine, you have standards defined for the ingestion, source data, and the destination.  Right here we could throw out a presumption (it is well founded) that the standards will be followed.

Another element to consider is the directive from management that the data being ingested is not to be altered by the SQL team to make the data conform to standards.  That responsibility lies squarely on the shoulder of the team providing the data.  Should bad data be provided, it should be sent back to the team providing it.

Following this mandate, you find that bad data is sent to the SQL team on a regular basis and you report it back to have the data, process, or both fixed.  The next time the data comes it appears clean.  Problem solved, right?  Then it happens again, and again, and yet again.

Now it is up to you.  Do you continue to just report that the data could not be imported yet again due to bad data?  Or do you now assume the responsibility and change your ingestion process to handle the most common data mistakes that you have seen?

I am in favor of assuming the responsibility.  Take the opportunity to make the ingestion process more robust.  Take the opportunity to add better error handling.  Take the opportunity continue to report back that there was bad data.  All of these things can be done in most cases to make the process more seamless and to have it perform better.

By assuming the responsibility to make the process more robust and to add better reporting/ logging to your process, you can only help the other teams to make their process better too.

While many may condemn assumptions, I say proceed with your assumptions.  Assume more responsibility.  Assume better processes by making them better yourself.  If it means rocking the boat, go ahead – these are good assumptions.

If you don’t, you are applying the wrong form of assumption.  By not assuming the responsibility, you are assuming that somebody else will or that the process is good enough.  That is bad in the long run.  That would be the only burning “elephant in the room”.

elephants

From here, it is up to you.  How are you going to assume in your environment?

T-SQL Tuesday #54 – Interviews and Hiring

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: May 13, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150

This month’s T-SQL Tuesday is hosted by Boris Hristov (blog|twitter) and his chosen topic is “Interviews and Hiring” – specifically interviewing and hiring of SQL Server Professionals.

 

This is a pretty interesting topic from a few different angles.  Boris proposed a few topics such as the following list.

 

  1. The story of how did you get hired on your latest position?
  2. The most interesting interview you ever had?
  3. How do you think an interview should be handled? What should it include?
  4. Any “algorithms” of how to find the perfect candidate?
  5. If you are the one that leads the technical interview – what do you focus on?
  6. What are the most important questions to ask for the various SQL Server positions out there?

Any one of these ideas would be good fodder for a blog article.  A combination of these topics might prove more interesting.  I think I will try something a little different.  I want to broach the topic of the use and abuse of interviews.

infinte

There are two interviews that come to mind that might be good examples.  The first is the infinite interview.

In the infinite interview, the candidate comes in for a full day of interviews (a surprise to the candidate).  If you were lucky you might have been informed in advance that the interview would be an all-day ordeal.

You arrive on-site and are shuttled from one interviewer to the next and so on throughout the day.  Most of these people will have absolutely nothing to do with your work queue or your job duties.  Most won’t be able to spell SQL other than maybe having a book that somebody might have given them.

In one such case, I had the opportunity to be grilled all day long.  The peak of the interview(s) occurred when their dev team sat down in an office, gave me chalk and eraser and required me to redesign their database that they took 6+ months to design and were still in the process of fixing bugs.  Lots of memorization based questions centered around developer (not database) terminology.

In short this pretty much felt like a free consultation session for them.  Once finished, I got to show my own way out the door.  Not by choice but by them being too busy for it.  And in the end not a word from the company.

The second kind of interview comes in the form of stump the chump.

stumpThis is another fun type of interview.  It can come in many forms.  Sometimes it can be in the form of free consultation.  Sometimes, the interviewer just gets his rocks off trying to prove he is smarter or that you are not as qualified as you say you are.

In the type where it comes as free consultation, the interviewer has usually been trying to resolve a production issue for quite some time and just can’t figure it out.  They will present a partial scenario to you and see if you can figure it out on limited info.  If you can’t, they might come back with “We already tried that” or they may provide more info.  Again, this is all in an effort to try and resolve a problem that they couldn’t.  Sometimes  it is often to try and save face with the boss showing that even an expert couldn’t do it.

The alternate style, the interviewer knows from the start that you may be overqualified but really wants to just prove they are as smart or smarter.  Often times it just proves that they have some really erroneous understandings about SQL Server.  One such interview, the person seemed to have an explicit Oracle background and wanted to get into the internals of SQL Server.  He wanted to get into index trees and tried to go down the path of some io statistics for queries based on a bunch of unknowns.

There is really only one thing to do in these types of interviews.  Once you recognize what is going on (be it stump the chump or the never-ending interview), politely excuse yourself and look for a position somewhere else.

T-SQL Tuesday #051: Bets and Results

Comments: 2 Comments
Published on: February 18, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150

The line for this months TSQL Tuesday required wagers be made concerning the risks and bets that have either been made or not made.

At close, we saw 17 people step up and place remarkable markers.  Today, we will recap the game and let you know who the overall winner from this week of game play in Vegas just happened to be.

poker-hands

 

This is about some bets, so we needed to understand some of the hands that might have won, right?

Let’s see the hands dealt to each of our players this past week.

Andy GalbraithAndy Galbraith (b|t) shared a full house of risk this month when talking about backups.  Do you have a backup if you haven’t tested it.

“without regular test restores, your backups do not provide much of a guarantee of recoverability.  (Even successful test restores don’t 100% guarantee recoverability, but it’s much closer to 100%).”

 

Boris HristovBoris Hristov (b|t) thought he was feeling lucky.  He couldn’t imagine things getting worse.  He even kept reminding himself that it couldn’t get worse.  He was dealt a hand and it was pretty good – and then everything just flushed down the drain.

A disaster with replication and with the storage system – ouch!

 

Chris YatesChris Yates (b|t) wanted to push his hand a little further than Andy this week.  Chris went all-in on his backups.  At least he went all-in early in his career.

The gamble you ask?  Chris didn’t test the backups until after he learned an important lesson.

“I’ve always been taught to work hard and hone your skill set; for me backups fall right into that line of thinking. Always keep improving, learn from your mistakes.”

 

Doug PurnellDoug Purnell (b|t) shares another risky move to make.  In this hand, Doug thought he could parlay maintenance plans into an enterprise level backup solution.

What Doug learned is that maintenance plans don’t offer a checksum for your backups.  After learning that, he decided to stay and get things straight.

 

Jason BrimhallJason Brimhall (b|t) took a different approach.  I took the approach of how these career gambles may or may not impact home, family, health, and career in general.

There is a life balance to be sought and gained.  It shouldn’t be all about work all the time.  And if work is causing health problems, then it is time for a change.

It’s important to have good health and enjoy life away from work.

 

Jeffrey VerheulJeffrey Verheul (b|t) had multiple hands that many of us have probably seen.  I’d bet we would even be able to easily relate.

In the end, what stuck with me was how more than once we saw Jeffrey up the ante with a story of somebody who was not playing with a full deck.  If you don’t have a full deck, sometimes the best hand is not a very good one overall.

 

Joey D'Antoni

Joey D’Antoni (b|t) had a nightmare experience that he shared.  We have all seen too many employers like what he described.

The short of it is summed up really will by Joey.

“The moral of this story, is to think about your life ahead of your firms. The job market is great for data pros—if you are unhappy, leave.”

 

K. Brian KelleyK. Brian Kelley (b|t) brought us the first four of a kind.  Not only did he risk life and limb with SQL 7, but he tried to do it over a WAN link that was out of his control.

When he bets, he bets BIG!  DTS failures, WAN failures, SQL 7, SQL 2000, low bandwidth and somebody playing with the nobs and shutting down the WAN links while laughing devishly at the frustration they were causing.

 

Kenneth FisherKenneth Fisher (b) thought he would try to one-up Jeffery by getting employers that would not play with a full deck either.

From one POS time tracking system to another POS time tracking system to yet another.  Apparently, time tracking was doomed to failure and isn’t really that important.

That seems to be a lot of hefty wagers somebody is willing to lay down.

 

Matt VelicMatt Velic (b|t) brought his A-game.  He was in a no prisoner kind of mood.

Matt decided he was going to real you in, divert your attention, and then lay down the wood hard.  Don’t try to get anything past Matt – especially if it wreaks of shifty and illegal.

The way he parlayed his wagers this month was a riot.

 

Mickey StueweMickey Stuewe (b|t) was the only person willing to Double-down and to even try to place a bet on snake-eyes.  With the two-pronged attack at doubles, she was able to come up with two pairs.

To compound her doubles kind of wagers, she was laying down markers on functions.  Check out her casino wizardry with her display of code and execution plans.

 

Rob FarleyRob Farley (b|t) was a victim of his own early success.  He had a lucky run and then it seemed to peter out a bit.  In the end he was able to manage an Azure high hand

Rob reminds us of some very important things with his post.  You can get lucky every now and again and be successful without a whole lot of foresight.  Be careful and try to plan and test for the what-if moment.

 

Bobby TablesRobert Pearl (b|t) rolled the dice in this card game.  He was hoping for a pair of kings with his pair of clusters and the planned but unplanned upgrade.

There is nothing like a last minute decision to upgrade an “active-active” cluster.  In the end Bobby Tables had an Ace up his sleeve and was able to pull it out for this sweet pair.

 

Russ Thomas

Russ Thomas (b|t) ever have the business buy some software and then thrust it on IT to have it installed last minute?

That is almost what happened in this story that had some interesting yet eventual results.

Russ weaves the story very well, but take your eye of the game at hand!!

 

Sebastian Meine

 

Sebastian Meine (b|t) brought needles to the table.  That is wicked crazy and leaves quite the impression.

Maybe he thought he was going to inject some cards into the game to improve his hand.  I was almost certain he had nothing going, but magically he was able to produce some favorable data.

Oh, that was the point of his post!  Have a weakness? It will be found, injected and exploited.

 

Steve Jones

Steve Jones (b|t) had a crazy house going.  Imagine 2000 or so people all trying to help you make your bets and play your hand.  That is a FULL house.

Of course, his full house was more to deal with a misunderstood risk with the application and causing performance problems in the database.

In the end, they fixed it and it started working better.  A little testing would have gone a long way on this one!

 

Wayne SheffieldWayne Sheffield (b|t) in perhaps the most disappointing and surprising turn of events, Wayne ended up with a hand that could have won but he folded.

Well, Wayne didn’t fold but there were some bets that resulted in people folding and maybe worse in the story that Wayne shares.  This can happen when you are betting on something you know nothing about and really should get somebody to help make the correct bets for you.

 

House

And to recap, the overall winner was…

the HOUSE.  With a winning hand of a royal flush.

Thanks to all of the SQLFamily for participating this month.  There were some really great experiences shared.  The posts were great and it was a lot of fun.  I hope you got as much enjoyment out of the topic and articles this month as I did.

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