September 2014 Las Vegas UG Meeting

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Published on: September 10, 2014

Who is up for a little free learning this week? Besides the opulence and feast that was the 24 Hours of PASS (Summit Preview), we have more training in store for you from the people in Las Vegas. Let’s call this a preview for next week which happens to be DevConnections (which also happens to be in Vegas)!!

The Las Vegas User Group is happy to announce our monthly meeting.  The meeting is available for in person and webinar style.  The start time is 6:30 PM Pacific and the details are listed in this post.  We hope to see you there!

Capture

Abstract: PowerShell: The Way of the DBA Dragon

In this introduction to PowerShell, attendees will learn how to start from scratch with PowerShell 3.0 or newer, use the pipeline, run T-SQL against multiple instances, use transcripts, and be shown martial arts usage of one of the SQLPSX cmdlets.  Scripts will be provided.

BIO

Lars Rasmussen was born in Illinois, but considers Utah home.  He does not play video games, is learning to camp and hike, and is happy to have shared the summit of Mt. Timpanogos with two of his sons.  Lars’ wife and four children help him smile and laugh, and the family dog is teaching him patience.  Playing board games is one his favorite pastimes.  He considers SQL Server, PowerShell, and CMD.EXE some of his dearest frenemies.  Lars enjoys the company of SQL Server professionals and sysadmins – he used to be one of the latter, and is employed as a database administrator for HealthEquity.

LiveMeeting Info

Attendee URLhttps://www.livemeeting.com/cc/UserGroups/join?id=MR7C92&role=attend

Meeting ID: MR7C92

T-SQL Tuesday #58 – Security Phrases

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Published on: September 9, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150Today is once again TSQL Tuesday.  This month the event and topic are being hosted by Sebastian Meine (blog | twitter).  You can read all about the topic this month on his blog inviting all to participate.

Despite Sebastian being a real cool kid, I was not too hip to the topic this month.  Not because it is a bad topic or anything, it’s just that I really had nothing that seemed to stand out as easy to write for the blog party.

Then all of a sudden, a nice fat, juicy pork chop landed right in my lap.

The Pork Chop

A client requested that I make some changes to a task on a development server for them.  As it happens, the task is a powershell script that was being run on a schedule via a Scheduled Task in the Windows “Scheduled Tasks” control panel.  Making the requested change is a no-brainer of a change – or it should have been.

The change was to change the owner/executor of the scheduled task to the service account for the SQL Service.  By doing that, they would be less likely for the job to fail in the future due to an employee leaving the company.

As luck would have it the client DBA happened to know the password for the service account.  When changing the task to use the service account with the supplied password, we soon discovered that the supplied password caused the service account to become locked.  OUCH!

Maybe it was just fat fingered?  Nope, no dice!  As it turns out the DBA had the incorrect password and did not know the correct password.  Worse, nobody else knew what the correct password was.  Due to this issue, I proposed that the sysadmins and I work together to get the password changed.  That is to be done at a future date.

In addition to this, we decided that the passwords need to be more accurately documented.  These should be stored in an encrypted vault (the application is your choice).  But the mere use of an encrypted vault is far better than the use of a sticky note to document passwords (and I have seen that far too often at client sites).

This is just a short and sweet post for the day.  I think that it demonstrates problems that can arise from bad password management and also the risks that could come from that password management.  In our case, it was at least a Dev server with minimal users.

Effects of sp_rename on Stored Procedures

There comes a time when mistakes are made.  Sometimes those mistakes can be as annoying as a spelling mistake during the creation of a stored procedure.  When a mistake such as that happens, we are given a few choices.  One could either rename the stored procedure, drop and recreate the stored procedure or simply leave the mistake alone.

When choosing to rename the stored procedure, one may quickly reach for the stored procedure that can be readily used for renaming various objects.  That procedure was provided by Microsoft after-all and is named sp_rename.  Reaching for that tool however might be a mistake.  Here is what is documented about the use of sp_rename to rename a stored procedure.  That documentation can be read at this link on MSDN.

We recommend you do not use this statement to rename stored procedures, triggers, user-defined functions, or views; instead, drop the object and re-create it with the new name.

And later in the same documentation, one can read the following.

Renaming a stored procedure, function, view, or trigger will not change the name of the corresponding object name in the definition column of the sys.sql_modules catalog view. Therefore, we recommend that sp_rename not be used to rename these object types. Instead, drop and re-create the object with its new name.

Now, a chief complaint against dropping and recreating the stored procedure, as recommended, is that process can cause permissions issues.  I am less concerned about the permissions issues and see that as more of a nuisance that is easily overcome due to great documentation and a few quick script executions to restore the permissions.  Despite that, I think we might have a means to address the rename and permissions issue that will be shared later in this article.

Using sp_rename

When using sp_rename, it would be good to understand what happens and what one might expect to see.  Let’s use the following script to create a stored procedure to step through an exercise to rename a stored procedure and evaluate the results.

When I execute that series of batches, I will get an output that matches the following.

renameme

 

When looking at the results we can see that the use of sp_rename does indeed change the name of the stored procedure as it is represented via sys.objects and metadata.  We can also see that the definition of the stored procedure does not change as it is held within the metadata.

If I choose to check the definition through the use of OBJECT_DEFINITION()  instead of sys.sql_modules, you will be pleased to know that sys.sql_modules calls OBJECT_DEFINITION() to produce the definition that is seen in the catalog view.

Well, that does pose a potential problem.  We see that the object definition is unchanged and may report the name as being different than what the object name truly is.  What happens if I execute the stored procedure?  Better yet, if I can execute the stored procedure and then capture the sql text associated to that plan, what would I see?

Yes!  The renamed stored procedure does indeed execute properly.  I even get three results back for that execution.  Better yet, I get an execution plan which I can pull a plan_hash from in order to evaluate the sql text associated to the plan.  In case you are wondering, the execution plan does contain the statement text of the procedure.  But for this case, I want to look at the entire definition associated to the plan rather than the text stored in the plan.  In this particular scenario, I only see the body of the procedure and not the create statement that is held in metadata.

plan

For this particular execution and plan, I can see a plan_hash of 0xE701AFB2D865FA71.  I can now take this and provide it to the following query to find the full proc definition from metadata.

And after executing that query, I can see results similar to the following.

execplancache_text

 

Now is that because in some way the query that was just run was also running OBJECT_DEFINITION()?  Let’s look at the execution plan for both OBJECT_DEFINITION() and the query that was just run.

obj_def_plan

 

Looking at the XML for that particular plan and we see xml supporting that plan.  There is no further function callout and the plan is extremely simple.

Now looking at the plan for the query involving the query_plan_hash we will see the following.

fngetsql

 

Looking at this graphical plan, we can see that we are calling FNGETSQL.  Looking at the XML for this plan, we can verify that FNGETSQL is the only function call to retrieve the full sql text associated to this plan execution.  FNGETSQL is an internal function for SQL server used to build internal tables that might be used by various DMOs.  You can read just a bit more about that here.

What now?

After all of that, it really looks pessimistic for sp_rename.  The procedure renames but does not properly handle metadata and stored procedure definitions.  So does that mean we are stuck with drop and create as the Microsoft documentation suggests?

If you have access to the full procedure definition you could issue an alter statement.  In the little example that I have been using, I could issue the following statement.

After executing that script, I could check sys.sql_modules once again and find a more desirable result.

And my results…

finallymatching

 

If you don’t have the text to create the proc, you could use SSMS to script it out for you.  It is as simple as right-clicking the proc in question, selecting modify and then executing the script.  It should script at with the correct proc name (the beauty of SMO) and then you can get the metadata all up to snuff in your database.

Of course, if you prefer, you could just drop and recreate the procedure.  Then reapply all of the pertinent permissions.  That is pretty straight forward too.

SQL Server UG in Vegas August 2014 Meeting

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Published on: August 13, 2014

evite

 

Another Great meeting and topic is coming to the folks in Las Vegas.  This month we have had the luck of finding Mike Fal (blog | twitter) step up and fill our speaker void.

Yes, it happens to be the second Thursday of the month already.  Being that time of month, the SQL Server UG of Las Vegas will be meeting at the Tahitti Village Resort and Spa to take in some great info on SQL Server and Powershell.

You can read the information about the meeting on our Meetup page here.  Or you can continue reading here.

Improving Database Restores with Powershell

Database restores are a key function of any database administrator’s job. However, it can be an extremely time consuming task to sort through your backups, find the right files, and then get your database up and running. In an emergency this will have a disastrous impact on your Recovery Time Objective(RTO) and lead to the dreaded angry-CTO-in-your-cube effect. By leveraging some easy-to-use Powershell scripts, you can avoid the second disaster and the pain that comes with it. By attending this session, you will understand how you can use the Powershell automation framework for database restores, see scripts that will let you restore faster, and learn techniques to extend these tools for migrating data and testing backups.

Michael Fal  

Mike Fal is a musician turned SQL Server DBA, with 10+ years of experience as a database administrator. He has worked for several different industries, including healthcare, software development, marketing, and manufacturing and has experience supporting databases from 1 GB to 4 TB in size. Mike received his a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1996 and has been caught playing trombone in public on more than one occasion.

LiveMeeting Info

Attendee URL:https://www.livemeeting.com/cc/UserGroups/join?id=4RD8NP&role=attend

Meeting ID: 4RD8NP

Whether you are in Vegas or you are somewhere else, you are welcome to join us.  We hope to see you Thursday evening.

T-SQL Tuesday #57 – SQL Family and Community

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: August 12, 2014

TSQL2sDay150x150Look at that, it is once again that time of the month that has come to be known as TSQL Tuesday.  TSQL Tuesday is a recurring blog party that occurs on the second Tuesday (most generally) of the month.  This event was the brainchild of Adam Machanic (Blog | Twitter).  

Anybody who desires to participate in this blog party is welcome to join.  Coincidentally, that open invitation is at the base of this months topic – Family and Community.  The invitation, issued by Jeffrey Verheul (blog | twitter), for this month said the following.

This month I would like to give everyone the opportunity to write about SQL Family. The first time I heard of SQL Family, was on Twitter where someone mentioned this. At first I didn’t know what to think about this. I wasn’t really active in the community, and I thought it was a little weird. They were just people you meet on the internet, and might meet in person at a conference some day. But I couldn’t be more wrong about that!

Once you start visiting events, forums, or any other involvement with the community, you’ll see I was totally wrong. I want to hear those stories. How do you feel about SQL Family? Did they help you, or did you help someone in the SQL Family? I would love to hear the stories of support, how it helped you grow and evolve, or how you would explain SQL Family to your friends and family (which I find hard). Just write about whatever topic you want, as long as it’s related to SQL Family or community.

What is it?

We have all likely seen SQL Family thrown about here and there.  But what exactly is this notion we hear about so often?

I think we have a good idea about what family might be.  I think we might even have a good idea of what a friend is.  Lastly, I might propose that we know what a community is.  When we talk of this thing called SQL Family, I like to think that it is a combination of family, friends and community.

mushroom

These are people that can come together and talk about various different things that span far beyond SQL Server.  We may only see each other at events every now and then.  Those events can be anything from a User Group meeting to a large conference or even at a road race (5k, half marathon, marathon).

These are the people that are willing to help where help is needed or wanted.  That help can be anything ranging from well wishes and prayers, to teaching about SQL Server, to lending a vehicle, or anything along that spectrum.

I have seen this community go out of their way to help provide a lift to a hotel or to the airport.  These people will help with lodging in various circumstances when/if they can.  These are the people that have been known to make visits to hospitals to give well wishes for other people in the community.

Isn’t that what friends / family really boils down to?  People that can talk to each other on an array of topics?  People that go out of their way to help?  Think about it for a minute or three.

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