Changing Default Logs Directory – Back to Basics

Every now and then I find a topic that seems to fit perfectly into the mold of the theme of “Back to Basics”. A couple of years ago, there was a challenge to write a series of posts about basic concepts. Some of my articles in that series can be found here.

Today, my topic to discuss is in regards to altering the default logs directory location. Some may say this is no big deal and you can just use the default location used during install. Fair enough, there may not be massive need to change that location.

Maybe, just maybe, there is an overarching need to change this default. Maybe you have multiple versions of SQL Server in the enterprise and just want a consistent folder to access across all servers so you don’t have to think too much. Or possibly, you want to copy the logs from multiple servers to a common location on a central server and don’t want to have to code for a different directory on each server.

The list of reasons can go on and I am certain I would not be able to list all of the really good reasons to change this particular default. Suffice it to say, there are some really good requirements out there (and probably some really bad ones too) that mandate the changing of the default logs directory to a new standardized location.

Changes

The logs that I am referring to are not the transaction logs for the databases – oh no no no! Rather, I am referring to the error logs, the mini dumps, and the many other logs that may fall into the traditional “logs” folder during the SQL Server install. Let’s take a peek at a default log directory after the install is complete.

I picked a demo server that has a crap load of stuff available (and yeah not so fresh after install) but where the installation placed the logs by default. You can see I have traces, default XE files, some SQL logs, and some dump files. There is plenty going on with this server. A very fresh install would have similar files but not quite as many.

If I want to change the Log directory, it is a pretty easy change but it does require a service restart.

In SQL Server Configuration Manager, navigate to services then to “SQL Server Service”. Right click that service and select properties. From properties, you will need to select the “Startup Parameters” tab. Select the parameter with the “-e” and errorlog in the path. Then you can modify the path to something more appropriate for your needs and then simply click the update button. After doing that, click the ok button and bounce the SQL Service.

After you successfully bounce the service, you can confirm that the error logs have been migrated to the correct folder with a simple check. Note that this change impacts the errorlogs, the default Extended Events logging directory, the default trace directory, the dumps directory and many other things.

See how easy that was? Did that move everything over for us? As it turns out, it did not. The old directory will continue to have the SQL Agent logs. We can see this with a check from the Agent log properties like the following.

To change this, I can execute a simple stored procedure in the msdb database and then bounce the sql agent service.

With the agent logs now writing to the directory verified after agent service restart as shown here.

At this point, all that will be left in the previous folder will be the files that were written prior to the folder changes and the service restarts.

The Wrap

In this article I have introduced you to an easy method to move the logs for SQL Server and the SQL Server Agent to a custom directory that better suits your enterprise needs. This concept is a basic building block for some upcoming articles – stay tuned!

This has been another post in the back to basics series. Other topics in the series include (but are not limited to): Backups, backup history and user logins.

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