Events By Feature

sql_features_xeWithin the world of SQL Server there are a few things one can be certain of – things will change. This is true of the features in SQL Server. Additionally, Extended Events is constantly evolving which underscores this constant change.

With all of this change occurring within SQL Server, sometimes it is difficult to figure out how to troubleshoot or track issues that relate to new features. Within the need to figure out how to troubleshoot the new features, there is the need to understand what tools are out there to help troubleshoot.

It is no big secret that Profiler cannot help you trace any of the new features. To help perform the task of tracing events related to new features one must take advantage of the power of Extended Events. Even knowing that you can use XEvents, there is still a need to know what is related to the feature.

In this article, I will show how you can discover the events related to specific features. In addition, I will provide enough base information to help you perform other discovery type queries on your own as you continue your exploration of XEvents. In case you are a bit behind in your exploration of XEvents, I have the perfect solution for you – my series on the topic that is continually growing. You can explore the full list of articles in the series by visiting the table of contents – here.

Events and Features

More and more I am being asked how to track which events belong to which features. I have also been seeing more people ask for a way to list the new features supported by XEvents. Thankfully there is adequate information within the XEvent metadata to help retrieve this type of information. The downside is that there is a bit of homework that must be done across a few versions of SQL Server to help produce the desired information. I have done that work and pulled the information into the following query to help make it easier for anybody else wishing to dive in and compare features and events across versions of SQL Server.

In the preceding query, I have provided an aggregation of the events and features across multiple editions of SQL Server. This aggregate of data is necessary to help see how the features are changing and how the events are changing within the features that remain constant from one version to the next.

Once that data is aggregated, I then provide a couple of sample queries that show what can be done with the data. I need to stress here that I have not provided an exhaustive set of queries to explore this data seven ways to Sunday. I have left those types of exercises up to the reader to explore and experiment.

The first example query shows how to pull the new features that can be “Traced” in the current version of SQL Server on which the query is being executed. The second example provides a difference count between versions of SQL Server to help illustrate the evolution of XEvents within SQL Server. The third query is a simple query to list out the number of events for each feature in your version of SQL Server.

From here, one might wish to explore all of the events that are related to a specific feature. This would be easily accomplished by querying out the data from the #presel temp table based on the feature name. Orrrr…one could query the desired feature by following the guidelines in this article.

Conclusion

In the article today, I have shown how it is possible to see the new events and how they relate to the various features within SQL Server. Being able to correlate events that can trap information about new features can and will help you evolve into that rock-star DBA you are trying to become!

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