Hidden GUI Gems

frostedsnowflakeThe GUI for Extended Events offers some power to help you get started with trying to work with Extended Events. As I have shown over the past few articles, some of this power comes with a bit of cost and may in fact not be as powerful as just using a script. You can flip back through the previous articles via this link.

Today, I have a few gems that are available to you in the GUI. These gems should help solidify your understanding of the tools available through the GUI to help work with Extended Events. So far I haven’t hid my preference for using a script over the GUI. That said, the GUI can be useful for a thing or two. I will explain in better detail further into the article.

Playing in the Mud

To show these gems, a little setup is required first. So I am going to start with the following sample session (started from the GUI):

debugwhat

The setup thus far is rather simple, I have selected two optional settings – “start the event session immediately after session creation” and “track how events are related to one another.” The next thing to do within the GUI is to make my way through the events and select the events I need. The events I want to select need to help me track information related to the SQL process stopping (exiting) and any info related to when a memory dump is created.

To try and find the appropriate events, I will go to the Events tab, click the drop down shown in the green box and select “Event names and descriptions” from the menu.

filtering_eventselect

After making that selection, then I can type a keyword within the text box under “Event library”. Typing in the term “dump” will produce no results. This means either I have no events that will meet my requirements or I need to try a different term, right?

Well, just to verify the results I desire to confirm what I have seen by using a script. Executing the following script:

This confirms my suspicion. The script returns several results with the term “dump” when querying both the descriptions and event names just as I did with the GUI. There is an interesting development however. All of the results show as being in the debug channel.

filtering_eventselect_script

So why do these results not display from the GUI? Well that is one of the hidden gems. The debug channel is not shown in the GUI results by default. This will prevent any events from that channel from being displayed. This can be changed by checking the box displayed in the following image:

channelfilter

Consider here the name of the Channel for a moment. These events may be obfuscated from search results by default for a good reason. Some of these events can have a significant performance impact on the instance. That said, there is the occasional good reason to need to use the events from this channel in order to troubleshoot specific issues on the server. You just have to dig harder at it.

Having resolved that issue, I have resolved on using the stack_trace and sql_exit_invoked events. So I select both of the events and then move on to the Data Storage tab so I can configure the target. The target I have chosen to use is the event_file target. Now that I have selected the events and configured a target, I can slick the script button. I recommend always using the script button rather than committing the session direct from the GUI. Clicking the script button here will yield the next gem.

Xe_debugwhat

I have scripted the session I configured in the GUI. Overlaying the general page of the session with the produced script shows the gem. While the track_causality setting does get scripted, the option to start the session after creating the session does not properly script. This is an interesting problem. While this produces a small negative impact, it is one to bear in mind. If you need to have the session started, then make sure to manually start it or script the start of the session to confirm it has been done.

A third gem is one that I have not shown here but one to play with in your free time. If you change the name of the session and then script it, see what happens.

These are just a few more gems that I have shown in the GUI tools for Extended Events. I recommend using a script where possible (which is just about everywhere), and I have not hid that fact. While useful to a small degree, I do not recommend using the GUI for most tasks (again with a recommendation to use a script instead). Using a script has numerous benefits above and beyond the use of a GUI.

If for some reason you are not using Extended Events simply because you wanted to use a graphical interface, I recommend reconsidering. The series of posts I have on Extended Events has plenty of useful scripts that will provide the functionality and ease of use for Extended Events to mitigate that internal lust for the GUI.

This has been another article in the 60 Days of XE series. If you have missed any of the articles, or just want a refresher, check out the TOC.

 

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