SQL Server and Defaults

TSQL2sDayWhat is that default setting?

SQL server does a fantastic job of having numerous settings at the server level and at the database level predefined for you. Additionally, the OS has a bunch of settings that are predefined. These are notoriously the default settings. Or as some would say: “Set it and Forget it Settings.” Sadly, the set it part never really happens – except during the install.

Today is the second Tuesday of the the month, and that means it is TSQL Tuesday. As I mentioned in a previous article, this month the topic is hosted by Andy Yun (blog | twitter). Andy has chosen to have everybody talk about default settings in SQL Server. You can read everything Andy has said in his invite for the month.

deadlydefaults

Defaults Defaults Defaults

I could ramble on about database settings that get changed, but I have already addressed the changing of database settings – here. While I did address the changing of the settings, I did not address that it is an awesome thing to use to find out who might be changing those default settings (at the database level) that you have already set and optimized for the instance.

Or I could go on about how the OS has various settings that are far less than optimal for SQL Server. A good example would the that tree hugger setting that I talked about last month. But rather than do that, I will advise that you just read that article – here.

Or we can belabor the point about a fantastic setting that equates to NOLOCK. But, that isn’t a default setting and one would need a pretty good reason to change the default setting to READ UNCOMMITTED. So, just read a bit about the coolness you can see in the execution plans when the NOLOCK directive is used – here.

There are just so many wonderful default settings within SQL Server (or within the Windows OS) that could be discussed or that have already been discussed.

About all of those settings, I will say this. Database Settings are not “One Size Fits ALL.” But that is what a default setting is trying to do. If you find default settings within a database, then you should probably evaluate the setting and make sure it is set appropriately.

What default to discuss then?

Rather than talk about a plethora of settings that could / should be changed, I want to speak about one I doubt most would consider. This is the default setting that can only be adjusted from between the ears!

This is a default behavior I have noticed with many DBAs. I have heard various names for this behavior and most are probably quite accurate. The default setting that I think should be changed is one that will lead to a longer more fulfilling career. Let me see if I can describe the behavior well enough.

Often times, companies will purchase monitoring software to help alert to problems within the environment. This is a good thing. A DBA can’t be available 24x7x365. So the software should be configured and tuned to each database to allow for different tolerance/alert thresholds. This is a good thing too – if it is done. When done properly, the DBA can get a good nights rest as well as feel confident the environment is running properly.

If the software is not properly tuned and configured, the DBA will probably rectify that sooner rather than later. This is not the big behavior to change.

What I do see all too often is a complete reliance on the software that is monitoring – to a fault. I have seen hundreds of DBAs just sit and watch the pretty little dials and gauges on the screen of the software and only react when one of the items turns red. A career surely can’t be built off of this kind of behavior.

Rather than sit there and wait for something to fail, why not proactively check the servers? Why not try to build a script repository that will do everything (and more) that the monitoring software can do? While building that repository, think of the skills that will be gained and the knowledge that can be retained across jobs! In addition, I have been some places where a script repository was able to replace the purchased software and saved 100’s of thousands of dollars per year in software maintenance costs.

One of my favorite statements is that a “Senior DBA should be able to script his own solutions!” Being able to create monitoring scripts to replace that canned app will certainly get you to that next level. It will also get you out of that default behavior of complete reliance on the canned software and imminent career stagnation.

Learn a little and grow your career.

Oh, and there are some great monitoring tools out there. They can provide a great asset to a company – if and when used properly.

saynoribbon

1 Comment - Leave a comment
  1. […] Jason Brimhall (@sqlrnnr ) takes an interesting twist, to talk about the one default we all share – ourselves. He also wrote a preview post the week prior, showing us how to track changes via Extended Events. […]

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