Extended Events and Data Types

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Published on: April 14, 2015

TSQL2sDay150x150

Today is another one of those installments in the long-running TSQL Party held monthly (a.k.a TSQL2SDAY).

This month we have an open invitation from Mike Donnelly (blog | twitter), asking us to talk about something new we have learned and then to teach about it. You can read the invitation in Mike’s own words on his blog.

Coincidentally, the topic is both pretty straight forward and easy on the one hand while somewhat difficult on the other hand.  Mike said: “The topic this month is straight forward, but very open ended. You must learn something new and then write a blog post explaining it.” I find the topic to be difficult because I will usually blog about a topic when I have learned something new. On the other hand, sharing new stuff  is pretty straight forward and enjoyable.  Enter the brain split!

So, what I have learned recently?

Quite a bit.  But what would I really like to share on this occasion?

For today, I would like to share more information about extended events.  XEvents are great.  There is a wealth of information to be garnered from XEvents.  Furthermore, XEvents provide a great opportunity to keep learning.

While researching some events to help troubleshoot a specific issue, it dawned on me that there was some info that I had only looked at when I was looking at specific events.  I started wondering how much of that info was out there.  So here I will share some of this information that is available to you via queries within SQL Server.  Much of this info is attainable through the re-purposing of some scripts I shared previously – here.

Custom Data Types

This wasn’t too much of a surprise because I had seen them throughout and taken advantage of the custom data types to get better information.  But I might consider these custom data types to be more of the EAV model coming through than custom data types.  One can expose the custom data types through an evaluation of data in the map_values DMV.  Let’s take a look at a script that would lay the groundwork to see these data types.

Evaluating this data, one will see that in addition to the “standard” datatypes such as integer, there will be a “wait_types” data type.  This data type will map to all of the wait types available through extended events.  Additionally, the event that is associated to each of these custom data types is exposed through this query.  When getting ready to use an extended event, knowing the kinds of data that will be exposed through a data point in the session will make the session data more usable.  Knowing there is a custom data type (yes, it is really just a key value pair), can be extremely helpful.

Collection Flags

Many of the available events have “customizable” collection flags exposed.  Understanding that these collection flags can be on or off is essential to saving some hair.  Not all data is automatically collected for all events.  Some prime examples of such events that do not automatically collect certain pieces of data are sp_statement_completed and object_created.  The nice thing about these flags is that they have a value of “customizable” in the column_type field.  Another good thing with these flags is that the description field gives a little documentation on what the behavior should be for the “on” and “off” states.

There is a good reason that some of those may be off by default.  The addition of this information may cause an additional load or may be information overload.  It is up to the consumer to determine if the data is going to be of significant importance.  Once determined, enable or disable the flag as appropriate.

These queries provide a good amount of information about the extent of custom data types as well as the collection flags that may be available to use when creating event sessions in SQL Server.  Understanding that this data and these options are there is important to capturing better event info.

Audit who Dropped the Database

In the first article on this topic (which can be read here), I discussed the problem of having a database get dropped and the need to find out who dropped the database and when they dropped it.  In that article, I demonstrated how the information (at least some of it) could be found through querying the default trace.  It is a good enough solution if you have not disabled the default trace.

On the other hand, what if you need to do something more flexible?  What if you wanted to track this down through a more robust tool such as extended events?  XEvents has what you need to be able to properly track these types of events.  In this article, I share how to use Extended Events to capture this kind of audit data.

There are a few things to note with this event session.  First is that I am trapping two separate events: sqlserver.object_deleted and sqlserver.object_created.  The next important note is that I have to enable a flag on both events to trap the database name.  That is done like this: SET collect_database_name = (1).  Last note is something that should be noticed after enabling the session and performing a couple of trials.  The events I am using will fire twice for every DROP or CREATE operation.  This happens due to the ddl_phase for each.  There is one event fired for the start of the event and then another event when the event commits or hits a rollback.  Because of this, I am outputting the ddl_phase in my query to read from the session data.  Let’s run a quick test and see how this data can be queried.

Also of importance is to note the file path for the output file. If the path does not exist or you do not have permissions to the directory, you will get an error message and the session will not create.

Nice and simple for a test. This should be enough to have trapped some data for our XEvent session.  Let’s parse the data and take a look.

With the XEvent session started, and a database that has been created and dropped, this last query will produce some data to help track who has been adding or removing databases from your SQL Instance.  If you have run the example code, you should see data very similar to what is shown in this next image.

xe_results

In the attached image, I have separated the pair of statements for the DB create from the pair of statements for the DB drop (recall that I mentioned each will fire twice).  I hope this serves you well in your attempts to reign in the control of your environment and discover who may be creating rogue databases or even dropping the databases that are essential to the business.  Enjoy!!

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