New Backup Behavior in SQL 2014

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: April 1, 2014

As has been well publicized, today is the official Release To Manufacturing date for SQL Server 2014.  You can read more about all of that here.

Something that hasn’t received much word is a new feature that is a game changer.  I’m not referring to the advancements with the In-Memory OLTP (aka Hekaton).  The real game changer in my opinion is the way backups will be treated in 2014.

encryptionSQL Server 2014 brings the added functionality of encryption to the database backups.  This is a significant improvement to securing data at rest.  This functionality applies to databases that have been TDE enabled as well as those that are not TDE enabled.  This functionality also applies to backups that are compressed and backups that are not compressed.

The beauty of this functionality is that all backups will be encrypted now by default.  What this means is that you need not configure anything on your end to make it happen.  Despite it being enabled by default, you can change the encryption method should you choose.

Another interesting note with this new default behavior is that all of your database backups will fail out of the box.  You might ask why.  Well, there are some pre-requisites that must be met in order for the encrypted backup to succeed.

Here are those pre-reqs.

  1. Create a Database Master Key for the master database.
  2. Create a certificate or asymmetric Key to use for backup encryption.

If you have not created your DMK, your backups will fail and you will be none the wiser until you try to restore that backup.  That is really the way you want to conduct your duties as a DBA, right?  You guessed it, the backup shows that it succeeds yet it does nothing.

As you move forward with your SQL 2014 implementation, ensure you create those DMKs and ensure your backups are safe.

Oh and in case you haven’t noticed, pay attention to today’s date.

 

1 Comment - Leave a comment
  1. […] For instance, I thought about the April Fools post I did about Backups in SQL 2014.  Mix a little truth and a splash of fun and you have a believable April Fools blog post.  You can read that post here. […]

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *










Calendar
April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar   May »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  
Content
SQLHelp

SQLHelp

  • @SQLSoldier: @MidnightDBA SMO via .Net. Why no PowerShell. PowerShell works with 2008 +. #sqlhelp
  • @MidnightDBA: Server: No SSMS, no powershell, SQL 08 r2. Best TSQL script to create sp_add_job statements, et al, for all jobs on the instance? #sqlhelp
  • @AMtwo: @ajneuman AFAIK, the only way to upgrade is to point SSRS at the DB, and let it do it's thing. What error do you get on upgrade? #sqlhelp
  • @ajneuman: Is there a way to manually upgrade the Report Server databae? It's failing to upgrade from version 147 to 174. #sqlhelp #SSRS #sqlserver2016
  • @AngryPets: @SQLYard #sqlhelp Nope - they just need to be sized to handle the indexes on them. I'd check file stalls vs all files to see if helping/etc.
  • @SQLPrincess: #sqlhelp Any ideas on how to reverse engineer a data flow diagram from queries to show the data transformations?
  • @SQLYard: @AngryPets Thnks so the 3 filegroups different sizes are normal then? I was thinking they needed to be aligned in size. #sqlhelp
  • @AMtwo: @SqlRyan If you want to use source control with your report designer, use Visual Studio + SSDT. #sqlhelp
  • @AngryPets: @SQLYard #sqlhelp [2/2] storage, they aren't as helpful as they could be in 'spin disk' days. But still have benefits. Can be over-used.
  • @AngryPets: @SQLYard #sqlhelp Index filegroups are/can-be a best practice - depending upon data, load, and IO subsystem. With more modern ... [1/2]

Welcome , today is Saturday, October 1, 2016