Table Hierarchy updated

Recently a need resurfaced to explore the foreign key tree (hierarchy/genealogy) as it related to a specific table within a database.  As I pulled out the script from the repository, I realized there was some unfinished work to be done.  But there was also some polish that needed to be added.  This is an update to the most recent posting of that script.  You can see several revisions in the series at this link or the group here.

Some of the changes involve formatting and and labeling.  I added a new column called “Direction” to help understand the relationship of the key to the table in question.  I also changed up the FKGenealogy (formerly called SortCol) to reflect the source table more accurately in the case when the key comes from an ancestor rather than a descendant.  The Level of the FK was also modified to help understand a little better how far away the ancestor was in relationship to the origin table.

A final adjustment also comes from the Genealogy attribute.  Ancestors were all starting at the wrong point in the lineage.  I adjusted that so the lineage can be seen from the point in the tree that the ancestor is related rather than as a root direct from the origin table.

All in all, this script should make more sense to the user than the previous versions.

T-SQL Tuesday #050: Automating Database Restores

Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: January 14, 2014

Here it is time for the party of the month for the SQL Server acolytes and I was running a bit behind.  Why?  Well, that was due in part to me rushing around trying to do some of what this months topic is.  Some would call that pretty could timing.

TSQL2sDay150x150Hemanth.D (blog|twitter) is hosting the T-SQL Tuesday blogging party this month, and he wants all of us to post about Automation. As Hemanth.D put it on his blog in his own words:

You could write about, what options you would consider when automating something? Where do you draw the line? What are our preferred tools for automation? T-SQL, PowerShell, VBScript or Batch files(?) or maybe just share something that you automated in the last couple of years.

You can read the invite he posted here.

History

As Hemanth.D mentioned in his invitation, this is not the first time this topic has come up for TSQLTuesday.  As it would happen, I also participated in the first go around with my contribution about sizing databases on limited information.  You can read that here.

This time around, I have a little bit of a different topic to approach.  I hadn’t considered this until after having read that Wayne Sheffield wrote about his efforts to verify backup files via script (automation).  You can read what Wayne wrote at this link.

Having read that, it seemed painfully obvious to me that I should go ahead and write about my efforts to automate backup restores.  After all, if you are verifying the backup files existence, you might also want to test the backups to ensure they are good.  Besides, we all need to test our backups anyway, right?

Present

I have a few different methods I have used over the years to automate restores.  In one iteration, the restore operations were hard coded in a procedure that was scheduled to run on a nightly or weekly basis.  It probably was also just hard coded to be specific to a database.  That kind of setup is not super useful except for that one database.

With that in mind, I worked on several iterations to help create a script for myself that would automate the restores of any database, with any number of backup files, to a different server, and not have file paths/names/anything hard-coded.  Well – there ended up being one thing hard-coded but that can be changed easily enough.

I decided on a script that would read the backup path for the most recent backup file from the msdb database of the server where the database was backed up.  I do this via a linked server that can be created/destroyed in the proc or that can reside permanently (I prefer to leave it in place).  Take the filepath of that backup file and restore it to the destination server.  All of this via tsql.

Now a caveat with this solution is that the backup path works best if it is a UNC path.  Even if you are backing up the database to the local server, backing up to UNC means that the restore operation can just grab that path and not encounter errors due to drive mappings (e.g. backed up to D but the D on the restore server is the cd-rom drive).

What if you don’t want to restore the source database with the same name to the new server?  Well, that has also been considered and a parameter can be passed to the stored procedure to allow for a new database name.  What if the default file paths are different?  That consideration has been made too!  All of that said, more testing is always welcome.

The script can be evaluated from here.

Next steps:

With the script, the next things to do would be to create SQL Agent jobs to run the script on a routine basis.  Test the script and verify it.

User of this script assumes all risk.

January 2014 S3OLV and Tabular Models

Categories: News, Professional, SSC, SSSOLV
Tags: , ,
Comments: 1 Comment
Published on: January 9, 2014

This is really late notice.  We had some extenuating circumstances this month and then a last minute cancellation.  Now that everything is squared away, we have some great news.invite

If you are in the Las Vegas area, you are welcome to attend our monthly meeting which is now being held at the south end of the strip.  This should put you a bit out of the way of the CES 2014 crowds – though you will probably have a fantastic time getting through the crowd.

Then again, maybe you just can’t peel yourself away from these types of things at CES.

single_car

 

Or maybe you are just too busy trying to find the right pair of speakers for your car at CES 2014.

carwbeats

 

Well good news!  S3OLV holds the meetings in the evening and the main show at CES should be pretty close to wrapping up.

Come join us this month for a presentation by Julie Koesmarno.  She hails from down under and is making time in her schedule last minute to help us out.  You can read all about the presentation and Julie at our Meetup site here.

Guess what else you can do by visiting our Meetup site.  You can find out about how we have changed venues to the South end of the Strip.  That’s right, S3OLV has moved.  We are now meeting at the Tahiti Village.  Details of the location are in the meetup.  Check it out.

Oh, and don’t forget.  We still offer an online virtual meeting space for the user group just in case you can’t make it in person.  Details for joining the virtual meeting are also in the Meetup page.

Day 12 – High CPU and Bloat in Distribution

This is the final installment in the 12 day series for SQL tidbits during this holiday season.

Previous articles in this mini-series on quick tidbits:

  1. SQL Sat LV announcement
  2. Burning Time
  3. Reviewing Peers
  4. Broken Broker
  5. Peer Identity
  6. Lost in Space
  7. Command ‘n Conquer
  8. Ring in The New
  9. Queries Going Boom
  10. Retention of XE Session Data in a Table
  11. Purging syspolicy

distribution

Working with replication quite a bit with some clients you might run across some particularly puzzling problems.  This story should shed some light on one particularly puzzling issue I have seen on more than one occasion.

In working with a multi-site replication and multi-package replication topology, the cpu was constantly running above 90% utilization and there seemed to be a general slowness even in Windows operations.

Digging into the server took some time to find what might have been causing the slowness and high CPU.  Doing an overall server health check helped point in a general direction.

Some clues from the general health check were as follows.

  1. distribution database over 20GB.  This may not have been a necessarily bad thing but the databases between all the publications weren’t that big.
  2. distribution cleanup job taking more than 5 minutes to complete.  Had the job been cleaning up records, this might not have been an indicator.  In this case, 0 records were cleaned up on each run.

The root cause seemed to be pointing to a replication mis-configuration.  The mis-configuration could have been anywhere from the distribution agent to an individual publication.  Generally, it seems that the real problem is more on a configuration of an individual publication more than any other setting.

When these conditions are met, it would be a good idea to check the publication properties for each publication.  Dive into the distribution database and try to find if any single publication is the root cause and potentially is retaining more replication commands than any other publication.  You can use sp_helppublication to check the publication settings for each publication.  You can check MSrepl_commands in the distribution database to find a correlation of commands retained to publication.

Once having checked all of this information, it’s time to put a fix in place.  It is also time to do a little research before actually applying this fix.  Why?  Well, because you will want to make sure this is an appropriate change for your environment.  For instance, you may not want to try this for a peer-to-peer topology.  In part because one of the settings can’t be changed in a peer-to-peer topology.  I leave that challenge to you to discover in a testing environment.

The settings that can help are as follows.

[codesyntax lang=”tsql”]

[/codesyntax]

These settings can have a profound effect on the distribution retention, the cleanup process and your overall CPU consumption.  Please test and research before implementing these changes.

Besides the potential benefits just described, there are other benefits to changing these commands.  For instance, changing replication articles can become less burdensome by disabling these settings.  The disabling of these settings can help reduce the snapshot load and allow a single article to be snapped to the subscribers instead of the entire publication.

Day 11 – Purging syspolicy

This is the eleventh installment in the 12 day series for SQL tidbits during this holiday season.

Previous articles in this mini-series on quick tidbits:

  1. SQL Sat LV announcement
  2. Burning Time
  3. Reviewing Peers
  4. Broken Broker
  5. Peer Identity
  6. Lost in Space
  7. Command ‘n Conquer
  8. Ring in The New
  9. Queries Going Boom
  10. Retention of XE Session Data in a Table

Garbage-Dump

Did you know there is a default job in SQL Server that is created with the purpose of removing system health phantom records?  This job also helps keep the system tables ,that are related to policy based management, nice and trim if you have policy based management enabled.  This job could fail for one of a couple of reasons.  And when it fails it could be a little annoying.  This article is to discuss fixing one of the causes for this job to fail.

I want to discuss when the job will fail due to the job step related to the purging of the system health phantom records.  Having run into this on a few occasions, I found several proposed fixes, but only one really worked consistently.

The error that may be trapped is as follows:

A job step received an error at line 1 in a PowerShell script.
The corresponding line is ‘(Get-Item SQLSERVER:\SQLPolicy\SomeServer\DEFAULT).EraseSystemHealthPhantomRecords()’.
Correct the script and reschedule the job. The error information returned by PowerShell is:
‘SQL Server PowerShell provider error: Could not connect to ‘SomeServer\DEFAULT’.
[Failed to connect to server SomeServer. –>

The first proposed fix came from Microsoft at this link.  In the article it proposed the root cause of the problem being due to the servername not being correct.  Now that article is specifically for clusters, but I have seen this issue occur more frequently on non-clusters than on clusters.  Needless to say, the advice in that article has yet to work for me.

Another proposed solution I found was to try deleting the “\Default” in the agent job that read something like this.

(Get-Item SQLSERVER:\SQLPolicy\SomeServer\Default).EraseSystemHealthPhantomRecords()

Yet another wonderful proposal from the internet suggested using Set-ExecutionPolicy to change the execution policy to UNRESTRICTED.

Failed “fix” after failed “fix” is all I was finding.  Then it dawned on me.  I had several servers where this job did not fail.  I had plenty of examples of how the job should look.  Why not check those servers and see if something is different.  I found a difference and ever since I have been able to use the same fix on multiple occasions.

The server where the job was succeeding had this in the job step instead of the previously pasted code.

if (‘$(ESCAPE_SQUOTE(INST))’ -eq ‘MSSQLSERVER’) {$a = ‘\DEFAULT’} ELSE {$a = ”};
(Get-Item SQLSERVER:\SQLPolicy\$(ESCAPE_NONE(SRVR))$a).EraseSystemHealthPhantomRecords()

That, to my eyes, is a significant difference.  Changing the job step to use this version of the job step has been running successfully for me without error.

I probably should have referenced a different server instead of resorting to the internet in this case.  And that stands for many things – check a different server and see if there is a difference and see if you can get it to work on a different server.  I could have saved time and frustration by simply looking at local “resources” first.

If you have a failing syspolicy purge job, check to see if it is failing on the phantom record cleanup.  If it is, try this fix and help that job get back to dumping the garbage from your server.

Day 10 – Retention of XE Session Data in a Table

This is the tenth installment in the 12 day series for SQL tidbits during this holiday season.

Previous articles in this mini-series on quick tidbits:

  1. SQL Sat LV announcement
  2. Burning Time
  3. Reviewing Peers
  4. Broken Broker
  5. Peer Identity
  6. Lost in Space
  7. Command ‘n Conquer
  8. Ring in The New
  9. Queries Going Boom

food-storage

 

Gathering event information is a pretty good thing.  It can do wonders for helping to troubleshoot.  What do you do if you need or want to be able to review the captured information in 3 months or maybe 12 months from now?

Retaining the session data for later consumption is often a pretty essential piece of the puzzle.  There is more than one way to accomplish that goal.  I am going to share one method that may be more like a sledgehammer for some.  It does require that Management Data Warehouse be enabled prior to implementing.

When using MDW to gather and retain the session data, you create a data collector pertinent to the data being collected and retained.  In the following example, I have a data collector that is created to gather deadlock information from the system health session.  In this particular case, I query the XML in the ring buffer to get the data that I want.  Then I tell the collector to gather that info every 15 minutes.  The collection interval is one of those things that needs to be adjusted for each environment.  If you collect the info too often, you could end up with a duplication of data.  Too seldom and you could miss some event data.  It is important to understand the environment and adjust accordingly.

Here is that example.

[codesyntax lang=”tsql”]

[/codesyntax]

Looking this over, there is quite a bit going on.  The keys are the following paramaters: @parameters and @interval.  The @parameters parameter stores the XML query to be used when querying the ring buffer (in this case).  It is important to note that the XML query in this case needs to ensure that the values node is capped to a max of varchar(4000) like shown in the following.

[codesyntax lang=”tsql”]

[/codesyntax]

With this data collector, I have trapped information and stored it for several months so I can compare notes at a later date.

Day 9 – Queries Going Boom

This is the ninth installment in the 12 day series for SQL tidbits during this holiday season.

Previous articles in this mini-series on quick tidbits:

  1. SQL Sat LV announcement
  2. Burning Time
  3. Reviewing Peers
  4. Broken Broker
  5. Peer Identity
  6. Lost in Space
  7. Command ‘n Conquer
  8. Ring in The New

Kaboom

Ever see an error like this??

The query processor ran out of internal resources and could not produce a query plan. This is a rare event and only expected for extremely complex queries or queries that reference a very large number of tables or partitions. Please simplify the query. If you believe you have received this message in error, contact Customer Support Services for more information.

Error 8623
Severity 16

That is a beautiful error.  The message is replete with information and gives you everything needed to fix the problem, right?  More than a handful of DBAs have been frustrated by this error.  It’s not just DBAs that this message seems to bother.  I have seen plenty of clients grumble about it too.

The obvious problem is that we have no real information as to what query caused the error to pop.  The frustrating part is that the error may not be a persistent or consistent issue.

Thanks to the super powers of XE (extended events), we can trap that information fairly easily now.  Bonus is that to trap that information, it is pretty lightweight as far as resource requirements go.

Without further ado, here is a quick XE session that could be setup to help trap this bugger.

[codesyntax lang=”tsql”]

[/codesyntax]

And now for the caveats.  This session will only work on SQL 2012.  The second caveat is that there are two file paths defined in this session that must be changed to match your naming and directory structure for the output files etc.

Should you try to create this session on SQL Server 2008 (or 2008 R2) instead of SQL Server 2012, you will get the following error.

Msg 25706, Level 16, State 8, Line 1
The event attribute or predicate source, “error_number”, could not be found.

Now that you have the session, you have a tool to explore and troubleshoot the nuisance “complex query” error we have all grown to love.  From here, the next step would be to explore the output.

Day 8 – Ring in The New

Categories: News, Professional, SSC
Comments: No Comments
Published on: January 1, 2014

This is the eighth installment in the 12 day series for SQL tidbits during this holiday season.

Previous articles in this mini-series on quick tidbits:

  1. SQL Sat LV announcement
  2. Burning Time
  3. Reviewing Peers
  4. Broken Broker
  5. Peer Identity
  6. Lost in Space
  7. Command ‘n Conquer

As tradition would have it, this is the first day of the new year.  This is the first day of 11111011110.

As tradition would also have it, the New Year also means that there was plenty of partying and reveling throughout the night leading up to and beyond the stroke of midnight.  One such party was reported as having the largest fireworks show in history.  Seeing some of the video and pictures – it was a spectacular show.  Check it here.

If you are interested in some of the other worldwide events, here is a pretty good slideshow of some of those parties too.

Another tradition that comes with New Year’s day is the quarterly announcement for MVP renewals (or newals) from Microsoft.  If you happen to know somebody that was recently announced has being an MVP for the next year – tell them thanks.

page 1 of 1








Calendar
January 2014
M T W T F S S
« Dec   Feb »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Content
SQLHelp

SQLHelp


Welcome , today is Tuesday, March 28, 2017